Cold War

CWIHP Director, Christian F. Ostermann has been appointed as a member to the Department of Interior's Cold War Advisory Committee

Christian F. Ostermann, director of the Center's History & Public Policy Program and Cold War International History Project, has been appointed by Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar as a member to the Department's Cold War Advisory Committee.

The committee is to assist the Secretary of the Interior in the preparation of a National Historic Landmark Theme Study to identify sites and resources significant to the Cold War.

Ostermann has led the Center's Cold War International History Project since 1997/98.

Stalin and Togliatti: Italy and the Origins of the Cold War

Stalin and Togliatti reveals the dependence of the Italian Communist Party on Soviet decisionmaking in the early Cold War and the willingness of Stalin to sacrifice the interests of the Italian Communist Party to Soviet foreign interests. It explores the connection between the domestic Italian politics and the international affairs during the final phases of the Second World War and in the first years of the Cold War.

A Distant Front in the Cold War: The USSR in West Africa and the Congo, 1956–1964

A Distant Front in the Cold War reveals West Africa as a significant site of Cold War conflict in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Although the region voided the extreme tensions of the standoff in Eastern Europe or in the Cuban missile crisis, it nevertheless offers a vivid example of political, economic, and propagandistic rivalry between the US and the USSR. Mazov presents evidence from previously inaccessible or unknown documents in Russian and US archives, as well as an international sampling of recent scholarly works.

Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty: The CIA Years and Beyond

Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty examines the first twenty years of the organization, policies, and impact of Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty, arguably one of the most important and successful policy instruments of the United States during the Cold War.

Rock and Roll in the Rocket City: The West, Identity, and Ideology in Soviet Dniepropetrovsk, 1960-1985

How did rock music and other products of Western culture come to pervade youth culture in Brezhnev-era Dniepropetrovsk, a Ukrainian city essentially closed to outsiders and heavily policed by the KGB? In Rock and Roll in the Rocket City, Sergei I. Zhuk assesses the impact of Westernization on the city’s youth, examining the degree to which the consumption of Western music, movies, and literature ultimately challenged the ideological control maintained by state officials.

New Documents from Dutch Archives

CWIHP is pleased to announce the publication of e-Dossier #21, "A mass psychotic movement washing over the country like a wave": Explaining Dutch Reservations About NATO's 1979 Dual-Track Decision, by University of Amsterdam Professor Ruud van Dijk.

International Conference: The Euromissiles Crisis and the End of the Cold War, 1977-1987

CWIHP is pleased to announce the international conference The Euromissiles Crisis and the End of the Cold War, 1977-1987, organized by the Machiavelli Center for Cold War Studies (CIMA), the Craxi Foundation, CWIHP, the George Washington University's National Security Archive, and the Universities of Paris I (Pantheon Sorbonne) and Paris III (Sorbonne Nouvelle), in cooperation with Bundeskanzler Willy Brandt Stiftung.

Rebellious Satellite: Poland 1956

Rebellious Satellite: Poland 1956 offers a social history of the mass movements that prompted political change and altered Polish-Soviet relations in 1956 but avoided a Soviet armed response. Paweł Machcewicz focuses on the people’s expression of grievances, and even riots—as opposed to “top-level” activities such as internal Communist Party struggles. He carefully depicts the protests that took place in Poznań in June 1956 and across Poland the following October and November.

Connecting Histories: Decolonization and the Cold War in Southeast Asia, 1945–1962

Connecting Histories: Decolonization and the Cold War in Southeast Asia, 1945–1962 draws on newly available archival documentation from both Western and Asian countries to explore decolonization, the Cold War, and the establishment of a new international order in post-World War II Southeast Asia. Major historical forces intersected here—of power, politics, economics, and culture on trajectories East to West, North to South, across the South itself, and along less defined tracks.

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