Cold War | Wilson Center

Cold War

New Documents from Dutch Archives

CWIHP is pleased to announce the publication of e-Dossier #21, "A mass psychotic movement washing over the country like a wave": Explaining Dutch Reservations About NATO's 1979 Dual-Track Decision, by University of Amsterdam Professor Ruud van Dijk.

International Conference: The Euromissiles Crisis and the End of the Cold War, 1977-1987

CWIHP is pleased to announce the international conference The Euromissiles Crisis and the End of the Cold War, 1977-1987, organized by the Machiavelli Center for Cold War Studies (CIMA), the Craxi Foundation, CWIHP, the George Washington University's National Security Archive, and the Universities of Paris I (Pantheon Sorbonne) and Paris III (Sorbonne Nouvelle), in cooperation with Bundeskanzler Willy Brandt Stiftung.

Rebellious Satellite: Poland 1956

Rebellious Satellite: Poland 1956 offers a social history of the mass movements that prompted political change and altered Polish-Soviet relations in 1956 but avoided a Soviet armed response. Paweł Machcewicz focuses on the people’s expression of grievances, and even riots—as opposed to “top-level” activities such as internal Communist Party struggles. He carefully depicts the protests that took place in Poznań in June 1956 and across Poland the following October and November.

Connecting Histories: Decolonization and the Cold War in Southeast Asia, 1945–1962

Connecting Histories: Decolonization and the Cold War in Southeast Asia, 1945–1962 draws on newly available archival documentation from both Western and Asian countries to explore decolonization, the Cold War, and the establishment of a new international order in post-World War II Southeast Asia. Major historical forces intersected here—of power, politics, economics, and culture on trajectories East to West, North to South, across the South itself, and along less defined tracks.

The Rosenberg Archive: A Historical Timeline

The Rosenberg Archive: A Historical Timeline is a timeline of events with links to relevant documents from The Vassiliev Notebooks. The release of notes taken in the KGB archives by Alexander Vassiliev makes it possible for the first time to draw a nearly complete picture of the recruitment, operations and exposure of the Rosenberg espionage ring. As the Rosenberg Archive makes clear, the Rosenberg case is probably the most well-documented major espionage case of the 20th century.

Stalin's Police: Public Order and Mass Repression in the USSR, 1926-1941

Stalin’s Police offers a new interpretation of the mass repressions associated with the Stalinist terror of the late 1930s. This pioneering study traces the development of professional policing from its pre-revolutionary origins through the late 1930s and early 1940s. Paul Hagenloh argues that the policing methods employed in the late 1930s were the culmination of a set of ideologically driven policies dating back to the previous decade.

Two Suns in the Heavens: The Sino-Soviet Struggle for Supremacy, 1962–1967

Using newly available archival sources, Two Suns in the Heavens examines the dramatic deterioration of relations between the USSR and China in the 1960s, whereby once powerful allies became estranged, competitive, and increasingly hostile neighbors.

Consumption and Social Change in a Post-Soviet Middle Class

What happens when your once-dignified profession no longer supports a dignified lifestyle? In 1990s St. Petersburg, teachers had to find out the hard way; although the institutions and ideologies of Soviet life situated them as "cultured" consumers, contemporary processes of marketization and privatization left them unable to attain what they now considered to be respectable material standards of living.

The Soviet Union and the June 1967 Six Day War

Why did the Soviet Union spark war in 1967 between Israel and the Arab states by falsely informing Syria and Egypt that Israel was massing troops on the Syrian border? Based on newly available archival sources, The Soviet Union and the June 1967 Six Day War answers this controversial question more fully than ever before. Directly opposing the thesis of the recently published Foxbats over Dimona by Isabella Ginor and Gideon Remez, the contributors to this volume argue that Moscow had absolutely no intention of starting a war.

Local Consequences of the Global Cold War

Up to now the study of cold war history has been fully engaged in stressing the international character and broad themes of the story. This volume turns such diplomatic history upside down by studying how actions of international relations affected local popular life.

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