Cold War | Wilson Center

Cold War

The Cold War in East Asia, 1945–1991

The Cold War in East Asia, 1945–1991 studies Asia as a second front in the Cold War, examining how the six powers—the United States, the Soviet Union, China, Japan, and North and South Korea—interacted with one another and forged the conditions that were distinct from the Cold War in Europe. The contributors are among the foremost historians of the new Cold War history, and this book draws on a wide array of newly available archival information in many languages, with particular strength in the use of Russian and Chinese archival material.

New From the CWIHP Working Paper Series: The Interkit Story: A Window into the Final Decades of the Sino-Soviet Relationship by James Hershberg, Sergey Radchenko, Péter Vámos, and David Wolff.

CWIHP is pleased to announce the publication of the latest addition to the CWIHP Working Papers Series, Working Paper #63: The Interkit Story: A Window into the Final Decades of the Sino-Soviet Relationship by James Hershberg, Sergey Radchenko, Péter Vámos, and David Wolff.

New From the CWIHP Book Series: The Cold War in East Asia: 1945-1991

CWIHP is pleased to announce the publication of the latest addition to the CWIHP Book Series: The Cold War in East Asia: 1945-1991 by Tsuyoshi Hasegawa.

Donga Daily article covers release of NKIDP Critical Oral History Conference transcript

An article carried in Korea's Donga Daily highlights new findings from a recently published NKIDP book, Crisis and Confrontation on the Korean Peninsula: 1968-1969 from the History and Public Policy Program Critical Oral History Conference Series. The article includes the new detail that the North Korean commando unit that attacked the South Korean presidential compound on 21 January 1968 also initially planned to besiege the U.S. Embassy in Seoul.

CWIHP Director, Christian F. Ostermann has been appointed as a member to the Department of Interior's Cold War Advisory Committee

Christian F. Ostermann, director of the Center's History & Public Policy Program and Cold War International History Project, has been appointed by Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar as a member to the Department's Cold War Advisory Committee.

The committee is to assist the Secretary of the Interior in the preparation of a National Historic Landmark Theme Study to identify sites and resources significant to the Cold War.

Ostermann has led the Center's Cold War International History Project since 1997/98.

Stalin and Togliatti: Italy and the Origins of the Cold War

Stalin and Togliatti reveals the dependence of the Italian Communist Party on Soviet decisionmaking in the early Cold War and the willingness of Stalin to sacrifice the interests of the Italian Communist Party to Soviet foreign interests. It explores the connection between the domestic Italian politics and the international affairs during the final phases of the Second World War and in the first years of the Cold War.

A Distant Front in the Cold War: The USSR in West Africa and the Congo, 1956–1964

A Distant Front in the Cold War reveals West Africa as a significant site of Cold War conflict in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Although the region voided the extreme tensions of the standoff in Eastern Europe or in the Cuban missile crisis, it nevertheless offers a vivid example of political, economic, and propagandistic rivalry between the US and the USSR. Mazov presents evidence from previously inaccessible or unknown documents in Russian and US archives, as well as an international sampling of recent scholarly works.

Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty: The CIA Years and Beyond

Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty examines the first twenty years of the organization, policies, and impact of Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty, arguably one of the most important and successful policy instruments of the United States during the Cold War.

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