Book Launch | Vietnam's American War: A History

The Woodrow Wilson Center’s History and Public Policy Program welcomes Pierre Asselin for a book launch discussion of 

A Joint Conference on Russia and North Korean Nuclear Weapons

Russia’s relations with North Korea are often ignored in the West, being overshadowed by China. Yet Russia has been a major player on the Korean Peninsula since the late 19th century. It was directly responsible for the creation of the North Korean state (the DPRK) and it still maintains a range of political, economic and social links. Indeed, Russia is now the only major country on more or less friendly terms with Pyongyang.

1917: The Empire’s Diverging Revolutions

We have long acknowledged and taught that 1917 was not one but many revolutions, including parallel, sometimes overlapping, but often conflicting movements of soldiers, workers, peasants, white-collar workers, and other intelligentsia and social groups. But all these revolutions were refracted through national, imperial, and colonial prisms, so there were also Ukrainian, Polish, Jewish, and Tatar revolutions.

Reading the Tea Leaves: The Future of Xi’s China

President Xi Jinping “has consolidated more power than any of his predecessors,” according to Kissinger Institute Director Robert Daly. When Xi convenes the 19th National Congress of the Communist Party of China, he will seek to continue his agenda for leading an evolving country into the 21st century. What can we expect? Daly provides insights into the workings of the party and Xi’s priorities in this edition of Wilson Center NOW.


Understanding the North Korean Regime

Research on North Korea’s government system has undergone significant changes since the 1990s. While it is still a challenge to conduct fieldwork in North Korea, to say the least, the strengthening of economic cooperation between North and South Korea, together with advancements in satellite technology, have increased the amount of information available. Testimonies by North Korean defectors are also rich sources of information, especially from former high-ranking government officials.

Russia’s Imaginary Stalin

Joseph Stalin, a Bolshevik who assumed dictatorial powers over the Soviet Union in the late 1920s and ruled until his death in 1953, is Russia's most popular revolutionary. Stalin’s popularity as a historical figure is now at its highest point of the past 16 years.

Book Launch | Konrad Wolf – But I Saw It Myself, This is the War: War Diary and Letters, 1942-1945

Konrad Wolf (1925-1982), renowned film director and longtime president of the East Germany’s Academy of Arts, left behind an extraordinary collection of historical documents: his War Journal. In three small notebooks of tightly written handwriting, the journal details his early years as a young man and solider enlisted in Soviet Russia’s Red Army (1943-1945).