Communism | Wilson Center

Communism

Kerry in Cuba: Can Relations Become “Normal”?

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry will take an historic trip to Havana, Cuba on August 14th to raise the stars and stripes at the U.S. embassy for the first time in over 50 years. He will be the first Secretary of State to travel there in 70 years. His visit brings to a close the first stage of diplomatic normalization with Cuba that began last December when Presidents Obama and Castro announced their intentions to do so.

Did Hiroshima Save Japan From Soviet Occupation?

In the wee hours of Aug. 24, 1945, Soviet long-range bombers would take off from their air base not far from the Far Eastern port of Vladivostok and fly east, across the Sea of Japan, dropping lethal payloads on the northern Japanese island of Hokkaido. At 5 a.m. that morning, two Soviet regiments would storm their way onshore, followed, in two hours, by a larger force. Within days, two infantry divisions would sweep across northern Hokkaido, cutting the island in half.

Ukraine’s Decommunization Laws: Legislating the Past?

In May 2015, the Ukrainian government passed four controversial laws aimed at initiating a clean break with the country’s communist past. Included in the laws are instructions on removing remnants of the communist past (monuments and street names), prescriptions on how to write the country’s history, as well as new measures to reconfigure the country’s archives.

Still Cozy After All These Years

Sixty-five years ago, on June 25, 1950, the Soviet-equipped North Korean army struck south of the 38th parallel. The ensuing three years of seesaw warfare turned much of the Korean Peninsula into ashes: Up to 3 million Koreans were killed or wounded before the two sides signed a cease-fire in July 1953. Millions more were left to pick up pieces of their shattered, divided lives.

The Regional Cold Wars in Europe, East Asia, and the Middle East: Crucial Periods and Turning Points

This book systematically explores the mutual interconnections of events in diverse regional Cold War theaters—both the horizontal connections between regions and the vertical connections of each regional conflict to the global Cold War. “How do we understand the Cold War,” writes the editor, Lorenz Lüthi, “if from one direction, we narrow the focus of inquiry from the superpower conflict to the level of regional struggles, and widen the focus from individual country case studies to the subsystemic level of the Cold War?”

From Free Europe to Free Poland: Free Europe Committee in the Cold War

From Free Europe to Free Poland: Free Europe Committee in the Cold War
 

Preface
Summary of Panel Discussions

Chinese Foreign Policy Database

Wilson Center Unveils Unprecedented Database of Chinese Foreign Policy History

WASHINGTON – The Wilson Center’s History and Public Policy Program unveiled the Chinese Foreign Policy Database, an online resource containing nearly 1,500 declassified documents on the international relations of the People’s Republic of China (PRC) since 1949. The freely-accessible database fills the critical need for sources and reliable information relating to China’s foreign policies.

China vs. Western Values: Xi Jinping’s Ideology Campaign

Ideology is once again playing a major role in U.S.-China relations. Government warnings against the pernicious influence of “Western values” have surged under Xi Jinping. And that concern has influenced policies toward the Internet, traditional media, culture and entertainment, universities, think tanks, and non-governmental organizations. Can China succeed in blocking Western influence? That’s the focus of this edition of REWIND

Book Talk: "Gulag Town, Company Town Forced Labor and Its Legacy in Vorkuta"

What was the relationship between the Gulag and Soviet society? What was the legacy of Stalin's massive system of forced labor? This talk explored answers to these questions using the case of Vorkuta, one of the Soviet Union's most notorious prison camp complexes. Built in the 1930s and 1940s to house the USSR's most dangerous criminals, the city would become a Soviet coal mining company town in the decades following Stalin's death. Vorkuta's story reveals new insights about the place of the Gulag in Soviet society and the system's legacy in Soviet and post-Soviet Russia.

Pages