Crime

Infographic: Citizen Security in Michoacán

 

Advancing Justice Sector Reform in Mexico

Mexico's deadline to fully implement new, adversarial criminal trial procedures is less than one year away. The government of Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto has pushed strongly to comply with the constitutionally mandated shift to the new criminal justice system by June 18, 2015, particularly in light of the country's ongoing security challenges. Together with the University of San Diego's Justice in Mexico program, the Mexico Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars will host a panel discussion to examine current efforts to implement the new reforms.

Citizen Security from the Ground-Up: Improving Practice at the Local Level

Improving citizen security remains a critical challenge throughout Latin America. Responses vary greatly between and also within countries—often down to the neighborhood level. With crime often concentrated in urban areas and neighborhood hotspots, local governments have emerged as sources of policy innovation in the fight against crime and violence.  What are these approaches and are there elements that are replicable in other cities, regions, or nations as a whole?

A Way to Restore Mexico’s Trust Deficit

The traditional stance of the PRI political party is to wait out protest: engage where essential and allow time to mollify.  Why then have the massacres of Tlatlaya and Ayotzinapa persisted in the Mexican mind? We approach 1 year since Tlatlaya when the Mexican army shot at close range 22 alleged gang members, claiming self-defense, and 8 months since 43 students at a famed teacher training College were murdered and thereafter disappeared.  The national uproar was intense with protest marches extending throughout the Mexican states and up into the United States.

Urban Violence: Building Safe and Inclusive Cities in Latin America

Join us for a panel discussion on policy options for building safe and inclusive cities in Latin America based on recent field research conducted in several major urban areas in the region.

Welcoming Remarks:

Cynthia J. Arnson, Director, Latin American Program, Woodrow Wilson Center

Introduction:

Eric Hershberg, Director, Center for Latin American and Latino Studies, American University

Panelists:

Políticas anticrimen deficientes

To view this video, click here

Beyond Google: The Dark Side of the Internet

Most people assume that a Google search can identify most of the information available on a given subject. But beyond the capabilities of Google or any other search engine, there is another online world. In fact, the number of non-indexed internet sites is estimated to be 500 times larger than what a search engine can reveal. And where the sun doesn’t shine, there exists a dark side of the Internet that is a conduit for all types of illegal and often dangerous activity.

Where Does Baltimore Go From Here?

As calm begins to return to Baltimore many long standing issues remain. They were not resolved during decades of decline and they are not likely going to be resolved in the short term. We asked Blair Ruble, Vice President for Programs and Director, Urban Sustainability Laboratory at the Wilson Center how the community can begin to move forward.

After Baltimore, we must see community as a process

Baltimore became my refuge when I moved to the District four decades ago. As a native New Yorker, I could not quite adjust to overly conformist official and bureaucratic life in a nation’s capital. Charm City’s quirky citizens just an hour away offered a much appreciated escape. Working-class Baltimore was the opposite of Washington, blues singer Leadbelly’s quintessential “Bourgeois town.” Watching Baltimore’s torment unfold in recent days has broken my heart.

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