Cyber Security

In a Post 9-11, Post-Snowden World, How Have We Changed?

It’s been said that “everything changed” in the wake of 9/11. While that may be an overstatement, Americans have certainly had to reexamine their tolerance for intelligence gathering as it relates to national security, particularly in the wake of revelations by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden. The evolving relationship between security and liberty is explored by a panel of experts in this edition of REWIND.

This is part 1 in a REWIND series on Surveillance, Security, and Trust. 

Featured Speakers

DHS 'Dos and Don'ts' on Cybersecurity

Is a cyber-attack on America’s electric grid imminent?   Or will hackers sabotage a major chemical plant this year?  Answers to these questions may surprise you because they’re slightly counterintuitive.

Many of the nation’s most-at-risk “critical infrastructure” sites – like power plants and chemical facilities – have analog redundancies in place that ensure catastrophic cyber-attacks won’t halt operations.  For now.

Does NSA Make Us Safer?

Does the NSA make us safer? Were Snowden's leaks good for the U.S.? Jane Harman discusses these questions with former NSA Director Gen. Keith Alexander and the ACLU’s Anthony Romero during MSNBC's first "Great Debate" from the Aspen Ideas Festival.

 

Jane Harman on the Anniversary of the Edward Snowden Leaks

Former Defense Department and CIA chief of staff Jeremy Bash and Wilson Center Director Jane Harman talks with Andrea Mitchell about NSA leaker Edward Snowden’s claims that he attempted to raise the red flag before leaking documents.

Is This the Best Response to China’s Cyber-Attacks?

I assume China is guilty as charged—that the five accused PLA officers or others in their demographic committed cyber espionage against American firms to steal technology and gain other competitive advantages. I assume there were more than five people involved.

New Terrorism and New Media

This report examines how Al-Qaeda, its affiliates and other terrorist organizations have moved their online presence to YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and other social media outlets, posing challenges to counter-terrorism agencies.

New Terrorism Meets New Media

The Internet proves to be a useful instrument for modern terrorists who use it for a wide range of purposes – from recruitment, radicalization and propaganda to data-mining and online instruction and training. However, cyber-savvy terrorists found the need to update their online presence. There is a clear trend of terrorist "migration" to online social media, including YouTube, Twitter and Facebook. Moreover, this trend is expanding to the newest online platforms such as Instagram, Flickr, and others.

Virtual Packs of Lone Wolves

Lone wolf terrorism is on the rise and online tools are making it easier. Fellow Gabriel Weimann, who has conducted a 15-year study on the impact of the Internet on terrorism, discusses the trend, its causes, and ways to track the lone wolf before an attack.

Read the full article on Medium.com>>>>

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