Cyber Security

Why to Fear ISIS's Cyber Caliphate

Yes, most 12 year old children could probably figure out how to hack a Twitter feed. But yesterday, the “Cyber Caliphate”— allegedly connected with the Islamic State of Iraq and al Sham— managed to gain access to social media accounts of US Central Command, responsible for American security interests in the Middle East.

35 Ways to Improve North American Competitiveness

35 Ways to Improve North American Competitiveness

The Takeaways:

1. North American collaboration is critical to the region’s future global competitiveness. However, rather than taking a single approach, the core operating principle should be subsidiarity—doing what makes sense at the level it makes sense.

Tomorrow’s Workforce: How Can America Remain Competitive?

Cybersecurity is vital for U.S. global security and competitiveness: data thefts compromise individuals, government agencies, and companies daily, threatening our economy.

It is difficult to name a sector whose assets are not housed within a digital infrastructure. From health care to financial services, aerospace to agriculture, business is strategically partnering with higher education to build a pipeline that will support its workforce needs.

Earning the Trust of “Digital Natives”

In order to effectively navigate the online environment in a manner that builds trust while also addressing security needs, government and non-government actors must address the questions and concerns of a generation raised in a digital world. The most tech savvy among us, as both citizens and practitioners, will have a lot to say about the future of digital surveillance and the laws that will regulate such activity. That’s the focus of this edition of REWIND.

This is part 4 of our series on Surveillance, Security, and Trust.

Speakers

Now for the Hard Part: Renewing Regional Cooperation on Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience

Critical infrastructure security and resilience (CISR) has been one of the core priorities for North American regional security cooperation since 9/11. More than a dozen years later, extensive consultation within and between the United States, Canada, and Mexico has finally begun to generate some tangible results, including ongoing information-sharing, the development of cross-border emergency response procedures, and joint exercises.

Terrorism in Cyberspace: The Next Generation

The war on terrorism has not been won, Gabriel Weimann argues in Terrorism in Cyberspace, successor to his seminal 2006 book, Terror on the Internet. Even though al-Qaeda’s leadership has largely been destroyed and its organization disrupted, terrorist attacks take 12,000 lives annually worldwide and jihadist terrorist ideology continues to spread. How? Largely by going online and adopting a new method of organization.

Government and Business: Cooperation or Conflict?

While governments are responsible for intelligence gathering in pursuit of national security, much of the technology and tools they rely on are created and owned by private companies. Consequently, there are significant opportunities for cooperation and conflict. That’s the focus of this edition of REWIND.

This is part 3 of the REWIND series on Surveillance, Security, and Trust.
 

Featured Speakers

Meg King, National Security Advisor to the Director, President, and CEO, Wilson Center

Do Friends Spy on Friends?

Do friends spy on friends? It’s a simple question requiring a complex answer. The question represents one of the most contentious aspects of the new global security environment. And while keeping an eye on allies as well as enemies is nothing new, agreement on where to draw lines on such activity remains elusive. That’s the focus of this edition of REWIND.

This is part 2 of our series on Surveillance, Security, and Trust.

In a Post 9-11, Post-Snowden World, How Have We Changed?

It’s been said that “everything changed” in the wake of 9/11. While that may be an overstatement, Americans have certainly had to reexamine their tolerance for intelligence gathering as it relates to national security, particularly in the wake of revelations by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden. The evolving relationship between security and liberty is explored by a panel of experts in this edition of REWIND.

This is part 1 in a REWIND series on Surveillance, Security, and Trust. 

Featured Speakers

DHS 'Dos and Don'ts' on Cybersecurity

Is a cyber-attack on America’s electric grid imminent?   Or will hackers sabotage a major chemical plant this year?  Answers to these questions may surprise you because they’re slightly counterintuitive.

Many of the nation’s most-at-risk “critical infrastructure” sites – like power plants and chemical facilities – have analog redundancies in place that ensure catastrophic cyber-attacks won’t halt operations.  For now.

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