Democracy Promotion

Toward a Society under Law: Citizens and Their Police in Latin America

Crime continues to undermine the rule of law and democracy in Latin America. The incidence and severity of crime reduce the community’s trust in police and in government, and many attempts to address the crime problem have stalled. Directly empowering citizens has, however, been a promising avenue for change. Toward a Society under Law focuses on community policing and on police reform.

Invisible No More

In the spring of 2006, more than three million immigrants—most of them originally from Mexico—marched through the streets of Chicago, Los Angeles, Phoenix, Milwaukee, Detroit, Denver , Dallas, and dozens of other U.S. cities, to protest peacefully for a comprehensive immigration reform that would legalize the status of millions of undocumented immigrants in the United States. Though few are voters—and even fewer in swing districts— migrants’ remarkably disciplined, law-abiding collective actions sent a message—“we are workers and neighbors, not criminals” that resonated on Capitol Hill.

Beyond Free and Fair: Monitoring Elections and Building Democracy

Beyond Free and Fair Elections: Monitoring Elections and Building Democracy draws on worldwide experience since the mid-1980s to evaluate international election monitoring and domestic monitoring, and their contributions to democracy promotion and democratic change. In this book, Eric Bjornlund provides an overview of what election monitoring is, where it comes from, and how it is currently conducted, and he educes general lessons for democracy promotion.

Russia in Search of Itself

In the turbulent decade since the collapse of the Soviet Union, conditions have worsened considerably for many Russians, and a wide-ranging debate has raged over the nature and destiny of their country. In Russia in Search of Itself, James H. Billington, the Librarian of Congress and a noted expert on Russia, examines the efforts of a proud but troubled nation to find a post-Soviet identity. The agenda has not been controlled from the top-down and center-out as in Russia’s past. Nor has it been set by any intellectual giant such as Sakharov or Solzhenitsyn.

Decentralization, Democratic Governance, and Civil Society in Comparative Perspective: Africa, Asia, and Latin America

Decentralization, Democratic Governance, and Civil Society in Comparative Perspective studies the relation of decentralization to democratization at both intermediate and local levels and analyzes how decentralization is transforming the relationship between the state and civil society. This book presents case studies from six countries in three continents in which decentralization of some parts of government has been attempted: Mexico, Chile, South Africa, Kenya, the Philippines, and Indonesia.

Regional Russia in Transition: Studies from Yaroslavl'

While the West tends to focus on Russia’s national institutions and practices when assessing the transition to democracy, Russia’s sub-national democratization will largely shape Russians’ views of their new government, willingness to participate in it, and trust in its ability to deliver. Regional and local government not only are nearer to ordinary citizens but have, under Russia’s federated constitution, highly important economic and social functions.

Combating Corruption in Latin America

Corruption persists as a challenge to the consolidation of Latin American democracies and to their economic development. Contrary to many expectations, policies to reduce the size of government, such as the privatization of state firms, have not proved a cure against corruption. In some cases, economic liberalization seems only to have worsened the problem.

For Democracy's Sake: Foundations and Democracy Assistance in Central Europe

Assisting democracy has become a major concern of the international community since the end of the cold war. Not only governments, but private actors—foundations and other nongovernmental organizations—are playing a growing role in these efforts, rivaling that of governments and international institutions. This pathbreaking study examines foundations’ democracy assistance programs in Central Europe in the years immediately following the fall of the Berlin Wall, both measuring their size and evaluating their strategies.

The Politics of Elections in Southeast Asia

Though most governments in Southeast Asia are widely described as authoritarian, elections have been a feature of politics in the region for many decades. This volume, bringing together eleven separate studies by leading authorities, examines the countries that have conducted multi-party elections since the 1940s and 1950s—Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Thailand, Cambodia, Burma/Myanmar, and Singapore. It identifies the common and distinguishing features of electoral politics in the region.

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