Democracy

Building a New Iraq: Women's Role in Reconstruction

Iraq’s progress toward democracy has been marred by violence, delays in reconstruction, and only intermittent nurturing of civil society. Despite these formidable obstacles, many Iraqis labor tirelessly for peace and stability. Among those strongly committed to a more stable Iraq are the country’s women, who face an ongoing, uphill battle for political representation. In the face of challenges, women leaders remain committed to ensuring their voices are heard in the new Iraq.

An Assessment of the Iranian Presidential Elections

The Middle East Project at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars arranged a series of meetings on June 25 and 26, 2001, to assess the June 9 presidential elections in Iran. A number of Iranian specialists from Iran and the U.S. took part in the sessions. This publication brings together the papers presented at these meetings. Edited by Haleh Esfandiari and Andrea Bertone.

Foreword, by Haleh Esfandiari

JUNE 25, 2001
Moderator, Shaul Bakhash

Middle Eastern Women on the Move

Introduction
Haleh Esfandiari

Women, Information Technology, and Human Development
Mahnaz Afkhami

Zanan: Trials and Successes of a Feminist Magazine in Iran
Roza Eftekhari

The Art of Female Publishing
Mansoureh Ettehadieh

Is Reformist Politics Good for Iranian Women?
Farideh Farhi

From Program to Practice:Towards Women’s Meaningful and Effective Political Participation in Jordan and Lebanon
Laurie King-Irani

Conflict and Cooperation: Making the Case for Environmental Pathways to Peacebuilding in the Great Lakes Region

Authoritarian regimes, genocides, and civil wars have plagued countries in the Great Lakes Region in recent years. The region’s nations rely heavily on natural resources—water, minerals, land—for their economic development, as well as for the livelihoods of their people, and many of the region’s conflicts are connected to these resources or other environmental factors.

Finding Dollars, Sense, and Legitimacy in Burma

All eyes were upon Burma's first election in 20 years. Did this election bear any significance to the country's political future? In an Asia Program publication, eight Burma experts weighed in, offering insights on the recent state of Burma's economy and politics. Edited by Susan L. Levenstein. Click on the attachment for a free PDF version.
 

Strategies for Promoting Gender Equity in Developing Countries: Lessons, Challenges and Opportunities

Strategies for Promoting Gender Equity in Developing Countries: Lessons, Challenges, and Opportunities examines both old and new strategies for promoting gender equity in development. As such, it draws upon expert scholars and practitioners to analyze individual cases from throughout the developing world. It also aims to identify policy options and suggestions for moving the current debate forward. This publication is a product of a conference co-sponsored by the Woodrow Wilson Center and the Inter-American Foundation.

 

 

It Always Rains in the Same Place First: Geographic Favoritism in Rural Burundi

On June 2, 2005, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and the Center for Strategic and International Studies hosted a conference entitled,“Uganda:An African ‘Success’ Past its Prime?” Before a full auditorium, Dr. Joel Barkan and Ambassador Johnnie Carson discussed recent political developments in Uganda, and the implications of these developments for long-term Ugandan democratization and stability.

Two Views on the Crisis in Sudan

Sudan faces multiple crises.  The CPA, which ended the southern conflict, has not been fully implemented.   International support has been patchy.   Demarcation of the North/South border has again been postponed. Preparations for the southern and Abyei referenda, due to be held in January, are well behind schedule, as are the popular consultations in Blue Nile and South Kordofan, where state elections have been put off until November.  Inter-tribal conflict troubles the South.

A New Dawn for Kenya: A Report on the Kenyan Referendum

The overwhelming passage of the new Kenyan constitution on August 4, 2010, represents a new dawn for Kenya and the citizens who have painfully and tirelessly fought for constitutional reforms for close to three decades. The 66.9 % majority emphatically underlines the singular desire for change from a 47 year old political system defined by, inter alia, an imperial presidency, incoherent and weak “devolution” structures and gross land and regional inequalities.

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