Democratic Transition

As Mexicans Buck Political Status Quo, Independent "El Bronco" Wins Election

A BREAK WITH TRADITION

A Fragmented Political Landscape

It's too early to know the full impact of yesterday's elections in Mexico, but there is no question that these were far more momentous than midterm elections usually are, with profound short-term and long-term consequences for the future of Mexico's political system.  Here are four quick takeaways on the implications of the results:

The Mexico Institute's 2015 Elections Guide

Colombia’s Peace Process: Measuring Public Opinion and Expectations for Transitional Justice

FARC negotiator Pablo Catatumbo said that the recent deadly army raid represented a “step back,” but that the progress made since Colombia’s peace process talks began in 2012 should not be “thrown overboard.” So negotiations continue in spite of tensions and setbacks. A new survey conducted by researchers from Georgia State University seeks to inform the process by providing information on public opinion regarding transitional justice, trust, and overall support for negotiations.

Sarajevo Roses, Tahrir Protests & Djerbahood: Injustice, Youth & Resilience

Within the past quarter century, two tectonic shifts have shaken international affairs: the end of the Cold War in 1991 and the uprisings across the Arab world in 2011. These groundbreaking changes were accompanied by violence and conflict, exemplified by the wars in the former Yugoslavia and state repression across several Arab countries. Dealing with post-conflict and post-authoritarian injustice in these contexts poses a number of challenges.

Middle East Realities That Challenge Obama’s Nuclear Deal With Iran

The emerging Iran deal that the Obama administration contends is comprehensive and definitive contains so many uncertainties, including those regarding Iran’s future nuclear weapons aspirations, that it might well turn out to be an extended interim accord.

This underscores an issue with a few things Secretary of State John Kerry recently said while defending the Iran deal–remarks that I presume he’d like to take back:

To Govern

The complexity of Mexico’s political life, the violence, and the corruption, but above all the absence of a real debate on domestic problems, has generated a thousand and one diagnoses on the nature of our dilemmas. It would appear obvious that our essential problem is not corruption, violence or criminality, but the absence of a system of functional government: that is, the three levels of government and the three branches of government. This is not a matter of guilt, of the good ones or the bad ones, but rather of essence. The question is how Mexico is going to be governed.

Intrepid Autonomy

How are the high-speed train to Querétaro and the brand new National Electoral Institute (INE) alike? Unfortunately, the similarity is less altruistic than is desirable. Some months ago, the Secretary of Communications went to Congress to defend the high-speed Querétaro train project, but as soon as he arrived at his office, he turned on his heel and announced that the project was suspended. The order had been issued from the top.

Mexico's Midterm Elections and the Peña Nieto Administration

The Wilson Center's Mexico Institute was pleased to host an event on Mexico's 2015 midterm elections. On June 7, 2015, more than 86 million Mexicans will have the opportunity to elect 500 federal deputies, 17 state-level legislatures, 9 governors, and more than 300 mayors. This new cohort of legislators will replace the group that approved the major reforms proposed by President Enrique Peña Nieto during the first year of his administration.

Public Opinion and the Peace Process in Colombia

 

Since the beginning of the peace process between the government of President Juan Manuel Santos and guerillas of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), public opinion polls have consistently reflected two impulses.  While the majority of the Colombian public supports the talks, there is also deep skepticism of the FARC’s interest in reaching or abiding by the terms of a final accord. The distrust has only deepened in the wake of a recent FARC attack that killed 11 soldiers, contravening a unilateral cease-fire declared by the guerrillas. 

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