Demography

Keep the Golden Years Shining: The Challenges of Long-Term Elderly Care in Japan and Beyond

Japan has one of the most rapidly ageing populations in the world, coupled with a falling birth rate. The fiscal, political, and social challenges facing public agencies, communities, and families to take care of elderly people are becoming ever more urgent. But the hurdles facing Japan are hardly unique. Other industrialized nations in Asia and beyond are facing similar challenges. Join us for a discussion on the dilemma of balancing formal and informal care amid changing demographic realities.

Roger-Mark De Souza on Population Dynamics, Climate Change & Resilience

Understanding population dynamics and climate change is essential to building resilience across the world's most vulnerable regions, said Roger-Mark De Souza in a recent interview with ClimateWire. Changes in climate are likely to hit hardest in regions with fast growing populations, but their connection goes even deeper.

U.S. Supreme Court Rules on Upholding Housing Discrimination Law

History and Context

The Fair Housing Act, part of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, prohibits discrimination based on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, familial status and disability in the sale, rental and financing of housing-related transactions. Intentional discrimination resulting in disparate treatment is forbidden.

Inequality in Mexico

Mexico's economic inequality has inhibited the country's economic growth and slowed the potential of its social and human capital. And extreme inequality has worsened over the last 20 years, with economic elites capturing most of the benefits of growth. The political and economic implications are huge.

Changing the World: How USAID’s 50 Years of Family Planning has Transformed People, Economies, and the Planet

Since President Lyndon B. Johnson created the USAID population program in 1965, it has evolved in tandem with the global discourse on population and demography. “The agency’s family planning program is as relevant today as it ever was, and is necessary,” said Jennifer Adams, deputy assistant administrator of the U.S. Agency of International Development’s Bureau for Global Health.

World Population Day 2015: Demographic Resilience

As events and discussions centered around World Population Day 2015 begin and continue, we spoke with the Wilson Center’s Roger-Mark De Souza about the concept of “demographic resilience.” Is a younger population more prone to conflict and instability? And what other contextual factors weigh in to the equation? He explains the meaning of “demographic resilience, and offers thoughts on its usefulness as a lens through which to view and assess the overall health of a community. That’s the focus of this edition of  Wilson Center NOW.

Can a Nuclear Deal Help Iran’s Young Labor Force?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Iran is poised to reap a vast “demographic dividend” if the appropriate national and international policies are adopted, including a nuclear deal with the P5+1. It is about time for Iran to capitalize on its human capital by allowing its young and educated labor force to compete in the global market. Countries generally have only one chance to reap the demographic dividend as they go through the demographic transition. Iran cannot afford to miss it.

The Sahel Beyond the Headlines: Population, Environment, and Security Dynamics

Between the Sahara to the north and savanna to the south lies the semi-arid Sahel, a region stretching from Senegal to Sudan that has experienced desperate poverty, climate change, malnutrition, and violence. While every context is different, the Sahelian countries share some common challenges, including a pattern of recurring crises and fluid borders. Boko Haram’s reign of terror in northern Nigeria and Mali’s coup have both had cross-border components.

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