Demography | Wilson Center

Demography

Inequality in Mexico

Mexico's economic inequality has inhibited the country's economic growth and slowed the potential of its social and human capital. And extreme inequality has worsened over the last 20 years, with economic elites capturing most of the benefits of growth. The political and economic implications are huge.

Changing the World: How USAID’s 50 Years of Family Planning has Transformed People, Economies, and the Planet

Since President Lyndon B. Johnson created the USAID population program in 1965, it has evolved in tandem with the global discourse on population and demography. “The agency’s family planning program is as relevant today as it ever was, and is necessary,” said Jennifer Adams, deputy assistant administrator of the U.S. Agency of International Development’s Bureau for Global Health.

World Population Day 2015: Demographic Resilience

As events and discussions centered around World Population Day 2015 begin and continue, we spoke with the Wilson Center’s Roger-Mark De Souza about the concept of “demographic resilience.” Is a younger population more prone to conflict and instability? And what other contextual factors weigh in to the equation? He explains the meaning of “demographic resilience, and offers thoughts on its usefulness as a lens through which to view and assess the overall health of a community. That’s the focus of this edition of  Wilson Center NOW.

Can a Nuclear Deal Help Iran’s Young Labor Force?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Iran is poised to reap a vast “demographic dividend” if the appropriate national and international policies are adopted, including a nuclear deal with the P5+1. It is about time for Iran to capitalize on its human capital by allowing its young and educated labor force to compete in the global market. Countries generally have only one chance to reap the demographic dividend as they go through the demographic transition. Iran cannot afford to miss it.

The Sahel Beyond the Headlines: Population, Environment, and Security Dynamics

Between the Sahara to the north and savanna to the south lies the semi-arid Sahel, a region stretching from Senegal to Sudan that has experienced desperate poverty, climate change, malnutrition, and violence. While every context is different, the Sahelian countries share some common challenges, including a pattern of recurring crises and fluid borders. Boko Haram’s reign of terror in northern Nigeria and Mali’s coup have both had cross-border components.

Global Trends, Local Stories: New Films on India and Ethiopia

On March 24, the DC Environmental Film Festival comes to the Wilson Center for the Washington, DC, premieres of two new short documentaries from ECSP, “Broken Landscape” and “Paving the Way.” Filmmaker and ECSP Multimedia Producer Sean Peoples will describe his journey from the eroded gullies of Ethiopia to the rat-hole mines of northeastern India during a panel discussion led by the Wilson Center’s Roger-Mark De Souza, with observations from Sierra Club's Kim Lovell and World Resources Institute's Ferzina Banaji.
 
About the films:

Countdown: Our Last, Best Hope for a Future on Earth?

Author, journalist, and professor, Alan Weisman tackles the big issue of global population growth in his newest book. His travels to dozens of countries in pursuit of answers led him to one x-factor that he believes holds the key to a sustainable future. From climate change, to energy, to agriculture, population is the reality that transcends all other issues. As Weisman puts it, everyone “is addicted to energy and food,” and more people equals resources stretched beyond capacity.

World Population is Growing, but the Earth is Not: What is the Key to a Sustainable Future?

Population growth is speeding toward a number between 10 and 12 billion humans by the end of the century. That rate of growth makes the challenge of building a sustainable future a daunting task. But important research presented in a new book, “World Population and Human Capital in the 21st Century,” suggests that population growth projections overlook one crucial variable that could prove to be the ultimate game changer. That’s the focus of this edition of REWIND.

Bridging the Gap: Family Planning, Rights, and Climate-Compatible Development

“There is no magic bullet or solution to resolving climate change quickly,” said the Population Reference Bureau’s Jason Bremner at the Wilson Center on October 28. “Our next 100 years will be far different from the last 100 or the last 1000…and it has become clear that nations will have to pursue many strategies in order to reduce emissions, build resilience, and adapt.”

Pages