Demography

Why Do People Move? Research on Environmental Migration Coming of Age

When she finished her dissertation on migration as a response to climate change in 2003, it was one of only a handful of scholarly papers published on the topic that year, said Susana Adamo, an associate research scientist at Columbia University’s Center for International Earth Science Information Network. But in the decade since, interest in climate migration has exploded – in 2012, more than 10 times as many papers were published.

The Rob Ford Phenomenon: What’s going on in Toronto?

Canadians and Americans look at the Rob Ford saga with a mix of amusement, curiosity, and horror. How did Ford become mayor of a sophisticated and progressive city like Toronto in the first place? And why does he continue to keep the support of a significant portion of the voting public?

What Can Governments Do About Falling Birth Rates?

“We have a fairly unique moment in the history of the world,” said Steven Philip Kramer, a professor at National Defense University, at the Wilson Center on April 17. “There’s never been a time when people have voluntarily produced fewer children than is necessary for sustaining the population.”

Forests on Film: New Stories from Nepal and the Congo Basin

Given growing awareness about environmental change and how it affects human life, it is perhaps not surprising there is also a growing audience for environmental filmmaking. At the 2014 Environmental Film Festival in the Nation’s Capital on March 25, the Wilson Center premiered ECSP’s latest documentary, Scaling the Mountain: Protecting Forests for Families in Nepal.

Make It Count: Evaluating Population, Health, and Environment Programming

Evaluation is the lifeblood of any development effort – it’s how implementers know if they’re making a difference, determine what to do more or less of, and enables funders to evaluate cost-effectiveness. But it’s also an inexact science, no more so than when it comes to complex interventions that cut across sectors.

Double Dividends: Population Dynamics & Climate Adaptation

If current projections hold, Africa’s population will more than double in 40 years, putting more people at risk of food, water, health, and economic insecurity as the climate changes, as well as n

New Policy Brief Series on Pakistan's Rapid Urbanization

Pakistan is South Asia’s most rapidly urbanizing country. In barely 10 years, nearly 50 percent of its 180 million people will live in cities (a third do today).

Fire and Ice Revisited: American and Canadian Social Values in the Age of Obama and Harper

Noted Canadian pollster and author Michael Adams will discuss his recent public opinion research tracking the evolution of Canadian and American social values. Adams will discuss some of the big changes he has observed since he published Fire and Ice: The United States, Canada and the Myth of Converging Values in 2004.

Fire and Ice won the Donner Prize in 2003 for best book on Canadian public policy, and was selected by the Literary Review of Canada as one of the hundred most important books ever published in Canada.

Ominous Divide: Shiite Iran vs the Sunni Gulf

Frederic Wehrey

What is the current state of Sunni-Shiite tension in the Gulf? How has it changed over the last 15 years?

Urbanization and Insecurity: Crowding, Conflict, and Gender

“If there was a perfect slum, Kibera would be it.” The notoriously overcrowded and underserved settlement in the Kenyan capital of Nairobi captivates the public imagination, engendering visions of urban violence, poverty, and hopelessness, said Caroline Wanjiku Kihato of the University of the Witwatersrand at the Wilson Center on February 18.

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