Demography | Wilson Center

Demography

'Dangerous Passage: Central America In Crisis And the Exodus of Unaccompanied Minors': Cynthia J. Arnson Testifies Before the US Senate Committee on Foreign Relations

Cynthia J. Arnson, Director of the Latin American Program, joined a panel of experts in testifying before the U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations to discuss crisis in Central America and what's driving the exodus of unaccompanied minors.

Time: 10:00 AM
Location: Senate Dirksen 419
Presiding: Senator Menendez

World Population Day 2014: Youth Engagement and the Sustainable Development Agenda

“The greatest challenge we have today is that we have a world that is pushing back on rights,” said Dr. Babatunde Osotimehin, executive director of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), at the Wilson Center.

Latin American Program in the News: "Wave of Central American migrants strains Border Patrol, reducing number of drug busts"

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As the humanitarian crisis intensifies, U.S. officials are raising the pressure on their Mexican and Central American counterparts to halt the flow of migrants, many of whom are driven by violence, poverty and the perception that they will be allowed to stay if they reach U.S. soil. Secretary of State John F. Kerry raised the issue during a recent visit to Mexico. And Vice President Biden was headed to Guatemala on Friday to discuss a tightening of that country's border with Mexico.

Dawn of the Smart City? Perspectives From New York, Ahmedabad, São Paulo, and Beijing

Rapid growth and environmental change are creating new challenges for urban areas around the world. From climate change adaptation and crime prevention to the integration of new residents, much is being asked of municipal governments. At the same time, new technologies – from data collection and real time monitoring to sophisticated “control centers” – are being developed that could help inform urban decision making and improve city management. Four essays present perspectives on the ideas behind smart cities from New York, Ahmedabad, São Paulo, and Beijing.

Why Do People Move? Research on Environmental Migration Coming of Age

When she finished her dissertation on migration as a response to climate change in 2003, it was one of only a handful of scholarly papers published on the topic that year, said Susana Adamo, an associate research scientist at Columbia University’s Center for International Earth Science Information Network. But in the decade since, interest in climate migration has exploded – in 2012, more than 10 times as many papers were published.

The Rob Ford Phenomenon: What’s going on in Toronto?

Canadians and Americans look at the Rob Ford saga with a mix of amusement, curiosity, and horror. How did Ford become mayor of a sophisticated and progressive city like Toronto in the first place? And why does he continue to keep the support of a significant portion of the voting public?

What Can Governments Do About Falling Birth Rates?

“We have a fairly unique moment in the history of the world,” said Steven Philip Kramer, a professor at National Defense University, at the Wilson Center on April 17. “There’s never been a time when people have voluntarily produced fewer children than is necessary for sustaining the population.”

Forests on Film: New Stories from Nepal and the Congo Basin

Given growing awareness about environmental change and how it affects human life, it is perhaps not surprising there is also a growing audience for environmental filmmaking. At the 2014 Environmental Film Festival in the Nation’s Capital on March 25, the Wilson Center premiered ECSP’s latest documentary, Scaling the Mountain: Protecting Forests for Families in Nepal.

Make It Count: Evaluating Population, Health, and Environment Programming

Evaluation is the lifeblood of any development effort – it’s how implementers know if they’re making a difference, determine what to do more or less of, and enables funders to evaluate cost-effectiveness. But it’s also an inexact science, no more so than when it comes to complex interventions that cut across sectors.

Double Dividends: Population Dynamics & Climate Adaptation

If current projections hold, Africa’s population will more than double in 40 years, putting more people at risk of food, water, health, and economic insecurity as the climate changes, as well as n

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