Diplomatic History

Germany Says No: The Iraq War and the Future of German Foreign and Security Policy

According to Dieter Dettke, Germany’s refusal to participate in the Iraq war signaled a resumption of the country’s willingness to assert itself in global affairs, even in the face of contradictory U.S. desires.

Connecting Histories: Decolonization and the Cold War in Southeast Asia, 1945–1962

Connecting Histories: Decolonization and the Cold War in Southeast Asia, 1945–1962 draws on newly available archival documentation from both Western and Asian countries to explore decolonization, the Cold War, and the establishment of a new international order in post-World War II Southeast Asia. Major historical forces intersected here—of power, politics, economics, and culture on trajectories East to West, North to South, across the South itself, and along less defined tracks.

Asian Diplomacy: The Foreign Ministries of China, India, Japan, Singapore, and Thailand

Based on over 160 interviews, Asian Diplomacy evaluates the ministries of foreign affairs in five major Asian countries. For each country, Kishan S. Rana first sketches the historical and political background of its diplomatic service. He reviews the structural features of the service; its responsibilities in such key areas as economic and political relations; and its methods for intragovernmental relations, decision making, and crisis management. He then provides a summary assessment of each service and concludes by asking what is special about Asian diplomacy.

The Soviet Union and the June 1967 Six Day War

Why did the Soviet Union spark war in 1967 between Israel and the Arab states by falsely informing Syria and Egypt that Israel was massing troops on the Syrian border? Based on newly available archival sources, The Soviet Union and the June 1967 Six Day War answers this controversial question more fully than ever before. Directly opposing the thesis of the recently published Foxbats over Dimona by Isabella Ginor and Gideon Remez, the contributors to this volume argue that Moscow had absolutely no intention of starting a war.

Soft Power and Its Perils: U.S. Cultural Policy in Early Postwar Japan and Permanent Dependency

This book examines the cultural aspects of U.S.-Japan relations during the postwar Occupation and the early years of the Cold War and analyzes their effect on the adoption of democratic values by the Japanese. Takeshi Matsuda finds that the results were mixed: Japan is an electoral democracy but intellectually remains elitist and submissive—in part because of U.S. efforts to reinforce the domestic importance of intellectual elites. The author is especially concerned with the development of American Studies in Japan, and U.S. efforts to foster it.

Diplomacy on the Edge: Containment of Ethnic Conflict and the Minorities Working Group of the Conferences on Yugoslavia

With ongoing war crimes trials, the yet unsettled status of Kosovo, and the odd assortment of new states struggling to create, reorder, and maintain political institutions, economies, and societies, the countries of the former Yugoslavia continue to challenge not only themselves but also the international community. Diplomacy on the Edge tells about the international efforts to mediate the political, economic, and social climate of these countries in 1991–2004 when some of the struggles were deadly.

Regime Change: U.S. Strategy through the Prism of 9/11

The 9/11 terrorist attacks starkly recast the U.S. debate on “rogue states.” In this new era of vulnerability, should the United States counter the dangers of weapons proliferation and state-sponsored terrorism by toppling regimes or by promoting change in the threatening behavior of their leaders? Regime Change examines the contrasting precedents set with Iraq and Libya and provides incisive analysis of the pressing crises with North Korea and Iran.

Behind the Bamboo Curtain: China, Vietnam, and the World beyond Asia

Based on new archival research in many countries, this volume broadens the context of the U.S. intervention in Vietnam. Its primary focus is on relations between China and Vietnam in the mid-twentieth century; but the book also deals with China’s relations with Cambodia, U.S. dealings with both China and Vietnam, French attitudes toward Vietnam and China, and Soviet views of Vietnam and China. Contributors from seven countries range from senior scholars and officials with decades of experience to young academics just finishing their dissertations.

Reins of Liberation: An Entangled History of Mongolian Independence, Chinese Territoriality, and Great Power Hegemony, 1911-1950

The author’s purpose in writing this book is to use the Mongolian question to illuminate much larger issues of twentieth-century Asian history: how war, revolution, and great-power rivalries induced or restrained the formation of nationhood and territoriality. He thus continues the argument he made in Frontier Passages that on its way to building a communist state, the Chinese Communist Party was confronted by a series of fundamental issues pertinent to China’s transition to nation-statehood.

Sino-Japanese Relations: Interaction, Logic, and Transformation

With the passing of the “friendship generation” and the increase in (mostly negative) societal participation in the late 1980s, the governments of China and Japan have found it increasingly difficult to navigate between the constraints and possibilities in their relationship. Based on ten years’ research in the United States, China, and Japan, this book argues that the relationship is politically now dispute-prone, cyclical, and downward-trending but manageable; militarily uncertain; economically integrating; psychologically closer in people-to-people contact yet more distant.

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