Drugs

Mexico's Role in the Deadly Rise of Fentanyl

Executive Summary

Since surging into the market in 2013, fentanyl has become the most lethal category of opioid in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimated that more than 47,000 people died from an opioid overdose in 2017 in the United States—28,000 of those deaths were due to synthetic opioids, which the CDC says is largely the result of the uptick in abuse of fentanyl.

Seventh Annual U.S.-Mexico Security Conference: New Government, Old Challenges in Mexico's Security Landscape

In this seventh annual Mexican security review, the forum examined the pressing security challenges Mexico faces and how it plans to respond, including the rising importance of the fentanyl trade for organized crime. Two new research papers on fentanyl were presented. The conference also featured leading policy analysts discussing major security trends in 2019, efforts to professionalize the police, the proposed National Guard, efforts to prevent crime and reduce violence, as well as the future of U.S.-Mexico security cooperation under a new Mexican president. 

Where Do We Go from Here? Merida 2.0 and the Future of Mexico-United States Security Cooperation

The inauguration of Andrés Manuel López Obrador on December 1, 2018 as President of Mexico opens a new era in Mexico’s security relationship with the United States. For the past 11 years, the United States and Mexico have anchored that relationship in a policy of shared responsibility where increased collaboration to address common security challenges has been the hallmark.

'Narcos: Transnational Cartels and Border Security': Earl Anthony Wayne Testifies before the U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary, Subcommittee on Border Security and Immigration

 

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Download the document below for full version of testimony.

Cooperation between Mexico and the United States regarding transnational crime is vital. Both societies pay a high price for the illegal traffic in drugs, money, guns and people that cross our common border.

FILM SCREENING | Fronteira da Grandeza: Brazil’s National Identity from Past to Future

From Iguaçu to the edges of the Amazon and through the centers of power in Brasília and São Paulo, see this vast country anew and learn from Brazilian voices why its people see a bright future amidst challengesincluding those that come across its borders.

 

Los Zetas Inc.: Criminal Corporations, Energy, and Civil War in Mexico

Los Zetas where once Mexico's most feared criminal organization dominating important smuggling routes from Central America into the United States. Their success was based in part on a business model that combined brute strength and predatory business practices. Join us for a discussion with the author of a new book, Los Zetas, Inc.: Criminal Corporations, Energy, and Civil War in Mexico and a panel of experts on the nature of criminal enterprise and the challenges of controlling illicit economies. 

The War on Drugs: The Narco States of North America

Too many Americans are dying from trafficked illegal drugs, and too many Mexicans are dying from violence related to the criminal gangs that traffic drugs. That is the unfortunate summary of a shared problem: Mexican organized crime groups help feed U.S. demand for illegal drugs, and in turn, many billions of U.S. dollars feed the violence and corruption which the criminal groups spawn in Mexico.

Fighting Organized Crime Endangered by NAFTA Hardball

The United States and Mexico need to redouble their cooperation against organized crime in order to save lives in both countries, but hardline U.S. proposals now expected in the ongoing NAFTA renegotiation could put this vital security cooperation at risk. 

What's Behind Rising Violence in Colima?: A Brief Look at 2016's Most Violent Mexican State

May 2017 was Mexico’s deadliest month on record.[1] 2,200 people were reportedly murdered nationwide that month, bringing the country’s death toll to nearly 10,000 since the beginning of the year. If the violence continues at this pace, 2017 will become Mexico’s most murderous year since the federal government began releasing homicide data in 1997, surpassing its previous annual homicide record of 23,000 murders in 2011.

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