Economics and Globalization

Obama Administration Relations with Central America: A Conversation with Seven U.S. Ambassadors

"Central America is in the news a lot these days, often for the wrong reasons," Cynthia Arnson, director of the Latin American Program at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, noted in her introduction to "Obama Administration Relations with Central America: A Conversation with Seven U.S. Ambassadors." Organized crime has flourished while the robust economic recovery enjoyed by South America has bypassed Central America and Mexico; meanwhile, the region's proximity to the United States has spotlighted immigration and trade issues.

Wilson Center Convenes Broad Bipartisan Coalition Crafting New Global Engagement Organization

On Monday, December 13, the Wilson Center will convene a large, bipartisan coalition that is drafting a business plan for a new independent organization for public diplomacy and strategic communications. The effort is part of the Center's Strengthening America's Global Engagement (SAGE), Initiative launched in September to act on the recommendation of more than a dozen major studies conducted since 9/11 to form such an organization. The business plan will determine in detail the mission, structure, programs, target markets, and budget of the organization.

Scholar Says Recession's Effects Will Linger for Years

As congressional elections approach, economic hardships factor prominently in voters' minds. But regardless of which party takes the majority in November, the effects of the economic recession will be felt for years to come, said Donald Peck, a Wilson Center public policy scholar.

Guatemala: A Post-Elections Assessment and Future Challenges

With none of the candidates in last Sunday’s Guatemalan presidential elections receiving the required 50 percent of the vote, the top two candidates are headed for a runoff election scheduled for November 6.  Former general Otto Pérez Molina of the right-of-center Patriot Party, who had been favored to come out ahead, secured just 36 percent of the votes, while business man Manuel Baldizón came in second with 23 percent.  A distinguished panel of experts will join us to dis

Emerging Trends in Environment and Economic Growth in Latin America and the Caribbean

Economic development and environmental sustainability in Latin America and the Caribbean are intrinsically connected, as evidenced by the July 22, 2010 seminar organized by the Woodrow Wilson Centers' Brazil Institute, on behalf of the Latin American Program, and co-sponsored by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). The seminar presented the report "Emerging Trends in Environment and Economic Growth in Latin America and the Caribbean," which identifies key trends likely to shape the economy and natural environment in Latin America and the Caribbean for the next 10 years.

Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke Discusses the Economy With Sam Donaldson at Wilson Center Board, Council Dinner

The Caged Phoenix: Can India Fly?

Dipankar Gupta, one of India’s foremost thinkers on social and economic issues, takes a critical—and controversial—look at the limits of the Indian success story in The Caged Phoenix. Through a fine blend of theory and new evidence on small scale industries, farming, and more, Gupta argues that, despite the promise of independence and liberalization, India continues to remain caged in backwardness. In short, the country’s phenomenal growth story has not translated into development.

Europe's Destiny: The Old Lady and the Bull

In this engaging, clever, and provocative account, Attila Marján offers a disquieting analysis of the complex challenges that Europe faces in the global marketplace.

Enterprising Women in Urban Zimbabwe: Gender, Microbusiness, and Globalization

Based on a series of interviews conducted throughout the 1990s, Enterprising Women in Urban Zimbabwe discusses the business and personal experiences of women entrepreneurs in the cities of Harare and Bulawayo, who worked in the market trade, crocheting, sewing, and hairdressing professions of the microenterprise sector.

Does North America Exist? Governing the Continent after NAFTA and 9/11

In the wake of the North American Free Trade Agreement and the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, renowned public intellectual and scholar Stephen Clarkson asks whether North America “exists” in the sense that the European Union has made Europe exist. Clarkson’s rigorous study of the many political and economic relationships that link Canada, the United States, and Mexico answers this unusual question by looking at the institutions created by NAFTA, a broad selection of economic sectors, and the security policies put in place by the three neighboring countries following 9/11.

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