Economics and Globalization | Wilson Center

Economics and Globalization

Urban Transport Development in China - Trends and Challenges

Although China's overall personal vehicle sales and ownership rates are low when compared to the United States, the roads in China's largest cities are already clogged with cars and their emissions are the leading source of urban pollution. The wave of car purchases increases monthly—one recent survey showed that 13 percent of urbanites in Shanghai, Beijing, and Guangdong intend to buy a car within the next 12 months.

Environmental Health Crises in Southwest China

Millions of rural and urban citizens in China suffer from health problems and limits to economic development due to contamination or shortages of water and air pollution from coal. In southwest China, water challenges are particularly acute due to that region's karst geology, where much of the water flows underground through caves rather than on the surface. These health problems are yet another burden on tens of millions of subsistence farmers.

The Double Edge of Legal Advocacy in Environmental Public Participation in China: Raising the Stakes and Strengthening Stakeholders

Drawing on the feature article they wrote for the China Environment Series 8, Allison Moore, American Bar Association and Adria Warren, Foley and Lardner, LLP, discussed the political and legal dynamics of the development of public participation in the environmental sphere in China.

Film Screening: China's Sorrow - Earth's Hope

Initiated in 1994 with funding and expertise provided by the World Bank and the International Development Association (IDA) , the Loess Plateau Watershed Rehabilitation Project successfully broke the cycle of environmental degradation and poverty in an area that had become known as the most eroded place on earth.

Film Screening: Dam or Damned? Documentary on China's Nujiang River

In southwest China the Salween River is named Nu Jiang, which means "River of Anger." It is one of the two rivers that still remains un-dammed in China. "Dam or Damned" examines how many environmentalists view this pristine river running through deep canyons with strings of rapids as a precious land hidden in a forgotten corner of southwestern China. But in the eyes of Chinese hydropower companies who are constantly seeking new sources of energy, the drastic drop of the rapids is a rare gift that shouldn't be left untapped.

China's Search for Energy Security and Implications for the U.S

In the face of growing energy shortages and rising oil import dependence China has embarked on a global search for secure energy supplies and transport routes, in the process raising a number of serious U.S. policy concerns and new tensions in U.S.-China relations. Kenneth Lieberthal and Mikkal Herberg, co-authors of a new study by The National Bureau of Asian Research will discuss key aspects of China's outward energy expansion, implications for the U.S., and recommendations for U.S. policy to prevent energy from becoming a more serious source of tension in U.S.-China relations.

Environmental Film Festival Screening: The Concrete Revolution

This meditation on life in a rapidly developing new China focuses on the daily transformation of Beijing's urban landscape as one of the world's largest cities prepares for the 2008 Olympics. Workers recruited from villages into Beijing's construction industry tell their stories of a culture in flux. Baring their souls to the female director, these men candidly reveal their feelings about separation from loved ones, financial desperation and hopes for the future as well as their vision of China in the 21st century.

The Role of the National Oil Companies in China's International EnergyPolicy

On May 26, 2005, the China Environment Forum and STAGE co-sponsored a seminar on China's national oil companies and energy cooperation in Northeast Asia that featured two researchers from the Centre for Energy, Petroleum, and Mineral Law and Policy at the University of Dundee, Scotland.

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