Economics and Globalization | Wilson Center

Economics and Globalization

Book Launch:The River Runs Black: The Environmental Challenge to China's Future

While the China Environment Forum has since 1997 held meetings and produced articles highlighting the myriad domestic and international efforts to resolve China's acute pollution and energy problems, few books have taken a comprehensive look at the historical and current causes of China's growing environmental crisis.

A Land on Fire: The Environmental Consequences of the Southeast Asian Boom

Over the past two decades, Southeast Asia has been on fire, both figuratively and literally. Economies throughout the region have exploded, taking advantage of small production costs and a low-paid, highly motivated workforce. At the same time, to fuel rapid growth, forests have been stripped for lumber and the land torched for new agricultural opportunities. Indeed, economic success has often come at the expense of the environment and with sixty percent of the world's population, environmental degradation in Southeast Asia has potential worldwide effect.

Harnessing the Waters: Nature Conquest in China's Past and Present

Perhaps no other issue in China today receives more news media attention than construction of the Three Gorges Dam. On billboards and in state-run media, the Chinese government trumpets the dam as a sign of the country's ability to achieve advanced engineering feats on par with the West; while concerned scientists, scholars, and activists around the world condemn the project as an ecological and social catastrophe. On 1 June 2003, the dam's reservoir officially began to take water.

The Soviet Bloc as a Project of Globalization

During a discussion held at the Wilson Center, Elidor Mëhilli argued that economic cooperation within the Soviet bloc should be viewed as a project of globalization characterized by intellectual and technical exchanges and implicit competition with the west. Mëhilli, a doctoral candidate in European and Eurasian history at Princeton University, focused on Albania, calling the small country in Southeast Europe an important laboratory for the "socialist experiment" and a useful case study to understand the nature of socialist exchange.

Why is Urban Assistance Important? Inserting Urban Issues Into the Development Agenda

This will be the concluding seminar of the CUSP series on Global Urban Poverty. Attendance is limited.
 

Sustainable Transportation Services for the Urban Poor

On February 20, 2007, the Comparative Urban Studies Project (CUSP) organized a seminar to discuss sustainable transportation services for the urban poor. Ellen Brennan Galvin, lecturer & senior research scholar at the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies at Yale University and CUSP advisory board member, pointed out that the links between poverty and transportation have long been ignored.

Global Urban Poverty Research Agenda: The African Case

Akin L. Mabogunje, Chairman of the Presidential Technical Board of the Federal Mortgage Bank of Nigeria, presented a paper entitled "Global Urban Poverty Research Agenda: The African Case" at a February 1 seminar organized by the Comparative Urban Studies Project (CUSP). A preliminary copy of the paper is available at the CUSP website.

An Incoherent Policy: Rule of Law Reform in Central Europe and Beyond

Rule of law promotion has become a leading policy goal for external actors working in developing countries. The standard narrative is that developing countries should adopt a modern legal system and effective legal institutions in order to achieve stability, fight corruption and attract investment, much like the countries of postcommunist Europe had done in the 1990s. Stephen Humphreys's analysis of rule of law theory and practice identified a wide gulf between the theory and the manner in which "rule of law" is promoted abroad.

Serbia's Transition: Towards a Better Future

The 20 years of Serbia's transition to a market economy will be discussed, explaining why a country that had among the best starting conditions in 1989 to implement the transition ended up substantially lagging behind. Although the emphasis is on economic transition, economic policies are examined within a wider context taking into account major political and historical events.

Hungary Under FIDESZ: A Retreat from Democracy?

The economic crisis in Hungary has evolved into a political crisis, as Viktor Orban's FIDESZ government has passed a number of laws and initiatives that severely thwart democracy. Orban's populism has led his government to restrict press freedoms, undermine the balance of powers and silence opponents in the arts and academia by cutting institutional budgets, while claiming austerity.

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