Education

FAPESP Week 2017: Nebraska & Texas

In 2017, from September 18 to 22, the São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP), the Wilson Center's Brazil Institute, the University of Nebraska–Lincoln and Texas Tech University will organize FAPESP WEEK NEBRASKA AND TEXAS. The symposium aims at strengthening the links between scientists from Brazil and United States with the objective of promoting research partnerships.

To see the full program of FAPESP Week 2017, click here.

 

Building on Early Success: Next Steps in U.S.-Mexico Educational Cooperation

Launched in 2014, the U.S.-Mexico Bilateral Forum on Higher Education, Innovation, and Research (FOBESII) seeks to "expand opportunities for educational exchanges, scientific research partnerships, and cross-border innovation to help both countries develop a 21st century workforce for both our mutual economic prosperity and sustainable social development." It aims to promote binational cooperation in higher education and research, especially regarding important areas for innovation in the United States and Mexico, by promoting programs for student mobility, academic exchange, research, and

“Tackling North America’s Workforce Challenges”: Ambassador Earl Anthony Wayne’s presentation to NASCO and Dallas County Community College District – Workforce Forum on August 31, 2017 in Dallas, Texas

A key challenge for all three North American economies is the training and education of their workforces as jobs, industries and sectors evolve and transform. The need for workforce development will likely only increase as new technologies are deployed and as we move into the Fourth Industrial Revolution, with higher use of advance technology in manufacturing and throughout the economy.

Cities in Play: Empowering Citizens and City Governments to Work for More Responsive Public Policies

As populations and economic potential become increasingly concentrated in urban areas, cities around the world are on the front lines of pressing global issues ranging from inequality to sustainability. Tackling these challenges requires both ingenuity and collaboration between public officials and citizens—and cities need to ensure that residents are equipped to engage. One way is through technology. Technology can be used to improve transparency, accountability, and communication between city officials and their residents.

Transforming the Education Sector to Meet Africa’s 21st Century Needs

On June 15, 2017, the Wilson Center Africa Program hosted a panel discussion on “Transforming the Education Sector to Meet Africa’s 21st Century Needs,” as part of the Brown Capital Management Africa Forum. The event featured three speakers, H.E. Professor Hassana Alidou, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the Republic of Niger to the United States of America; Dr. Phillip Clay, Professor Emeritus and former Chancellor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and Mr. Paul Mugambi, Chief Executive Officer, Kytabu.

Chinese Students in America: Who Returns, Who Remains, Who Benefits?

Beijing has established several programs to lure overseas students back to China to teach, conduct research, lead institutions, and build comprehensive national power. A recent study co-authored by Professor David Zweig suggests, however, that China’s top talent is spurning such offers and are remaining abroad, becoming, in effect, American, Australian, or Canadian talent.

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