Elections

Challenges for Romania's Democratic Consolidation: Assessing the 2009 Presidential Elections

The Romanian presidential elections held last fall provoked accusations of mudslinging, electoral fraud and, most recently, even interference by the occult. Vladimir Tismaneanu offered to bring this debate back to solid ground by presenting his assessment of Romania's path to democracy. Although he found no evidence of the occult, Tismaneanu did point to some idiosyncrasies of the party system in the country as well as what he called the "baroque" coalitions that are characteristic not only of Romanian politics but also of other post-communist European democracies.

Serbian Foreign Policy and the Possibility of Cooperation within the Western Balkan Region

Recent surveys indicate that public support for the Serbian Progressive Party (SPP), which split from the Serb Radical Party last fall, has grown steadily, and is now at the heels of the Democratic Party, which leads the current government. SPP Party leader Aleksandar Vucic, explained the young party's foreign policy strategy at a Wilson Center noon discussion.

Party systems and the EU Accession Process in Serbia and Croatia

Andrew Konitzer, associate professor of political science, Samford University
This event will take place in the 5th floor conference room.

Offsite Event: Democratic Setbacks in Nicaragua: A Conversation with Carlos Fernando Chamorro

This event took place at the Open Society Foundations, 1730 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, 7th Floor Conference Room A, Washington, D.C. 20006.

Carlos Fernando Chamorro, Founder and Editor of Confidencial, discusses Nicaragua's state affairs and eroding democracy following Nicaragua's Supreme Court decision to allow President Daniel Ortega to run for consecutive re-election.

Guatemala: A Post-Elections Assessment and Future Challenges

With none of the candidates in last Sunday’s Guatemalan presidential elections receiving the required 50 percent of the vote, the top two candidates are headed for a runoff election scheduled for November 6.  Former general Otto Pérez Molina of the right-of-center Patriot Party, who had been favored to come out ahead, secured just 36 percent of the votes, while business man Manuel Baldizón came in second with 23 percent.  A distinguished panel of experts will join us to dis

Congress and the People: Deliberative Democracy on Trial

Will some form of direct democracy supplant representative, deliberative government in the twenty-first century United States? That question is at the heart of Donald R. Wolfensberger’s history of Congress and congressional reform, which runs back to the Constitution’s creation of a popularly elected House of Representatives and forward to the surreal ending of the 105th Congress, featuring barrels of pork, resignation of the speaker, and impeachment of the president.

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