Environment

Bridging Research and Policy on Climate Change and Conflict

Globally, we have seen an increase in climate impacts and security risks. At the same time, we have seen substantial progress in research on how climatic changes may alter or enhance the propensity for new violence or interact with existing conflicts. 
 

China’s Supply Chain Challenge – From Timber to Minerals

As the world’s factory, China’s international supply footprint for extractive raw materials is expansive and growing, from timber to minerals, such as copper, and cobalt. However, China’s domestic policies don’t adequately regulate Chinese outbound investments and Chinese industry has few incentives to green their supply chains or monitor the social impacts. In countries such as Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands, illegal and environmentally unsustainable logging practices have been driven by the overwhelming demand for timber from China and other countries.

What’s at Stake in Brazil’s Election? The Future of the Amazon

The upcoming presidential runoff in Brazil will have a critical impact on fate of the Amazon, writes Somini Sengupta for the New York Times.

Traditional Populations, Land Rights, and Environmental Justice: The Challenges of the Amazon

The concept of environmentalism has changed over time. Initially focused on flora and fauna, conservation efforts increasingly strive to include the populations who have traditionally inhabited these lands. The change was partially prompted by criticism of traditional conservation strategies, which tend to follow Yellowstone’s top-down approach to conservation that favors extremely limited land use by local populations.

Urban Waste Revolution: Turning China’s Sludge and Garbage Mountains into Low-Carbon Solutions

China has a sludge problem. A big one. Wastewater plants in Chinese cities produce a staggering 40 million tons of this semi-solid slurry each year, enough to fill all of Manhattan with a 19-inch deep sludge lake. However, only one-fifth of China’s sludge is properly treated, while the rest is sent to landfills, incinerators, or illegally dumped. Similarly unsustainable methods are used to dispose of the mountains of solid waste generated by China’s urbanites.

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