Environment

Connections Between Climate and Stability: Lessons from Asia and Africa

"We, alongside this growing consensus of research institutes, analysts, and security agencies on both sides of the Atlantic, think of climate change as a risk multiplier; as something that will amplify existing social, political, and resource stressors," said Janani Vivekananda of International Alert.

Choke Point: Confronting Energy Demand and Water Scarcity in China

China's soaring economy, fueled by an unyielding appetite for coal, is threatened by the country's steadily diminishing freshwater reserves. Even as China has launched enormous new programs of solar, wind, hydro, and nuclear power development, which tend to use much less water and generate much less carbon, energy demand will skyrocket and will primarily rely on supplies of coal, the source of 70 percent of the nation's energy.

Managing Our Forests: Carbon, Climate Change, and Fire

"We cannot manage our planet if we cannot manage our forests," said William Sommers, a research professor with the Center for Climate and Society at George Mason University. The event, which coincided with the International Year of Forests, was the fourth in a series co-sponsored by George Mason University and the Environmental Change and Security Program on Managing the Planet.

Bolstering Global Food Security

Dramatic events over the last year have shed light on the problem of global food security: massive fires in Russia, which reduced wheat supplies; famine and drought in Niger and Chad; and food price riots in the Middle East and elsewhere. These stresses come amid price spikes that echo the food crises of 2008 and reveal the linked nature of food security today.

Climate Adaptation, Development, and Peacebuilding in Fragile States: Finding the Triple-Bottom Line

"The climate agenda goes well beyond climate," said Dan Smith, secretary general of International Alert.

What "Lost" Cultures Can Contribute to Management of Our Planet

"Climate change is not a technical problem for indigenous people – it's a psychological and spiritual problem," said Wade Davis, explorer-in-residence at National Geographic, at the third in a series co-sponsored events by George Mason University and the Environmental Change and Security Program. Indigenous people are "being driven out of existence," as climate change alters landscapes and weather patterns that they have carefully adapted to over centuries, he said.

Managing the Planet's Freshwater

"The impact of human activities on the planet and on its biology has risen to a scale that deserves a commensurate response," said Tom Lovejoy, professor at George Mason University, introducing a discussion on "Managing the Planet's Freshwater," the second of a monthly series led jointly by George Mason University and the Woodrow Wilson Center. Karin M.

Deforestation, Population, and Development in a Warming World: A Roundtable on Latin America

"Rural development and MCH [maternal child health] in the most remote, rural areas are going to largely explain the future of Latin American conservation, development, population, and urbanization," said David Lopez-Carr, associate professor of geography at the University of California, Santa Barbara."

A Dialogue on Managing the Planet

"Collectively, the impact of humanity on the way the planet works is enormous and headed in disturbing directions," said George Mason University professor Thomas Lovejoy in January at the first in a monthly series, "Managing the Planet," led jointly by George Mason University and the Woodrow Wilson Center.

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