Environmental Peacebuilding

At the Eye of the Storm: Women and Climate Change

Struggling to save their failing crops. Walking farther afield to fetch clean water. Protecting their families from devastating storms and violent conflicts. “Women are usually the support systems for our family…we are the last to leave in the event of a catastrophe, which is why women and families are disproportionately hurt by climate catastrophes,” said Wilson Center President, Director, and CEO Jane Harman on June 23 during a conference on women and climate change.

Human Rights and the Environment: How Do We Do Better?

2015 was a deadly year for environmental activism. According to Global Witness, 185 activists were killed, a 60 percent increase from 2014. Of the victims, 40 percent were indigenous people, like Berta Cáceres, who spoke at the Wilson Center last year and was shot and killed in her home in Honduras this March. 

Women's Leadership in Conservation and Peace

It used to be a luxury to talk about the environment when you were addressing conflict. Today, “we recognize it’s not a luxury anymore,” said Liz Hume, senior director for programs at the Alliance for Peacebuilding, at the Wilson Center on April 29. Similarly, gender dynamics are now being recognized as playing a critical role in sustainable development and peacebuilding.

Peace After Paris: Addressing Climate, Conflict, and Development

2015 was a historic year for international commitments to sustainable development, climate change action, and new kinds of peacebuilding. For governments and policymakers, now comes the difficult task of living up to those commitments.

Pathways to Resilience: Evidence From Africa on Links Between Conflict Management and Resilience to Food Security Shocks

In 2015, the NGO Mercy Corps released some surprising findings from conflict management programs in the Horn of Africa. Interventions from 2013 to 2015 focused on building community-level cooperation, strengthening institutions, and enhancing resilience.

The Paris Climate Agreement: What Was Achieved and What’s Next?

Is this the climate change “game changer” that the world has been waiting for? An expert panel gathered to assess what was accomplished during the Paris climate talks, and what the agreement means moving forward.

Rule of Law and the Environment: Rights, Resources, and Governance

On January 19, 2016, the University of South Carolina Rule of Law Collaborative, in cooperation with the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, will host "Rule of Law and the Environment: Rights, Resources and Governance," a JusTRAC symposium that will focus on the intersection between rule of law issues and the environment. Discussion will focus on how rule of law plays a role in environmental harm and resource instability and how environment concerns and resource scarcity in turn create rule of law problems. The symposium will bring together leading figures from key U.S.

Success in Paris: Adoption of the Global Climate Agreement

Negotiations in Paris concluded successfully when a deal was reached. The Wilson Center’s Director of Population, Environmental Security, and Resilience, Roger-Mark De Souza, explains the expected impact that adoption of the global climate agreement will have on island nations and beyond.

Lessons from the Development of Binational and Civil Society Cooperation on Water Management at the U.S.-Mexico Border

Mexico and the United States are partners in a number of agreements that imply joint management of natural resources and have had a long and productive history of sharing water resources. The two countries share water resources in the Colorado and Tijuana river basins, and in the Rio Grande basin; the joint utilization of their waters is defined by the Treaty of February 3, 1944 and its Minutes. 

Peace, Conflict, and the Scale of the Climate Risk Landscape (WEBINAR)

The Wilson Center's Environmental Change and Security Program is promoting a five-session webinar series hosted by The Security and Sustainability Forum and the Global Security Initiative (GSI) at Arizona State University to facilitate a national dialogue about the global security implications of climate risk.

REGISTER FOR THE WEBINAR HERE

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