Environmental Peacebuilding | Wilson Center

Environmental Peacebuilding

ECSP Report 3: Official Statements and New Publications

Excerpts from recent official statements in which environmental issues are cited in the context of security institutions and national interests, and reviews by experts of new publications.

Reviews include:

ECSP Report 2

In the 1996 issue of the Environmental Change and Security Program's annual report, Miriam R. Lowi writes about water disputes in the  Middle East, while Dennis Pirages explores "microsecurity" – the connection between disease organisms and human well-being.  Also in this issue: a look at overseas contamination by the military; an action plan for population, development, and environment; and Thomas Homer-Dixon's findings from a project on environment, population, and security; among other articles. Complete report.

ECSP Report 2: Feature Articles

In the 1996 issue of ECSP's annual report, Miriam R. Lowi writes about water disputes in the Middle East, while Dennis Pirages explores "microsecurity". Also in this issue: a look at overseas contamination by the military; an action plan for population, development, and environment; and Thomas Homer-Dixon's findings from a project on environment, population, and security.

Includes:

ECSP Report 1: Feature Articles

The first-ever ECSP Report includes Geoff and David Dabelko's feature on redefining environmental security; Richard Matthew's commentary on demystifying the concept of environmental security; and Marc Levy's call for a third wave of environmental security scholarship.

Includes:

Chapter One: Analyzing Environment, Conflict, and Cooperation

What are the gaps in the analysis of environment, conflict, and cooperation (ECC) linkages, and how can applied research fill them? This chapter identifies ten methodological, analytical, and substantive opportunities for future research, and five areas in which focused analysis could bolster policymaking.

Chapter Two: Institutionalizing Responses to Environment, Conflict, and Cooperation

Alexander Carius and Geoffrey D. Dabelko analyze gaps in institutional responses to environment and conflict. They propose a dialogue on best practices and innovative institutional efforts that will help researchers and policymakers move beyond reacting to symptoms of environment and security linkages and towards learning from interventions that bolster confidence and cooperation rather than instability.

Chapter Three: Early Warning and Assessment of Environment, Conflict, and Cooperation

Marc Levy and Patrick Philippe Meier recommend that assessments and early warning systems integrate environmental variables more completely and effectively. The authors assert that the international system has little capacity to monitor and assess conflict and cooperation on environmental issues.

PECS News Issue 9 (Spring 2004)

Contents include:

An Oasis in the Desert: Navigating Peace in the Okavango River Basin - Anton Earle and Ariel Méndez

The President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief: Stepping Up to the Global Challenge - Excerpts from a speech by U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator Randall L. Tobias

Sparing Nature: The Conflict Between Human Population Growth and Biodiversity (Event Summary)

The Security Demographic: Population and Civil Conflict After the Cold War (Event Summary)

Breaking the Conflict Trap: Civil War and Development Policy (Book Review)

PECS News Issue 6 (Spring 2002)

PECS News Issue 6 contents include:

The Road to Johannesburg: Setting the Agenda for the World Summit on Sustainable Development (Event Summary)

Does Population Matter? New Research on Population Change and Economic Development (Event Summary)

U.S. Foreign Policy and Global Health: Addressing Issues of Humanitarian Aid and Political Instability (Event Summary)

Supporting Livelihood and Food Security in Coastal Philippine Communities through Population-Environment Programming - Robert Layng

Hong Kong Conference Report: Section 7 (English)

A major focus of ECSP meetings and publications in Washington, DC has been to critique and explore the policy relevance of the growing body of research that posits environmental degradation can be a catalyst for various forms of conflict between nations, regions, and peoples.2 In addition to this environmental-security agenda, since 1997, ECSP also has been running the Working Group on Environment in U.S.-China Relations, which has aimed to foster dialogue among policymakers, NGOs, and academics in the United States and China on environmental and energy cooperation.

Pages