Environmental Security

UNEP's GEO-6 North American Report: Informing the 2030 Development Agenda

With so much focus on global environmental problems, many may wonder how their region is faring more specifically. This is the sentiment behind the United Nations Environment Program’s process for the latest iteration of its flagship assessment, the Global Environmental Outlook 6 (GEO-6). 

At the Eye of the Storm: Women and Climate Change

Struggling to save their failing crops. Walking farther afield to fetch clean water. Protecting their families from devastating storms and violent conflicts. “Women are usually the support systems for our family…we are the last to leave in the event of a catastrophe, which is why women and families are disproportionately hurt by climate catastrophes,” said Wilson Center President, Director, and CEO Jane Harman on June 23 during a conference on women and climate change.

Wild Laws: China and Its Role in Illicit Wildlife Trade

Picture your typical farm: Pigs, cows, chickens, goats…and tigers? This may sound far-fetched, but many iconic wild animals – including tigers, bears, and rhinos – are now farmed en masse in China.

Peace After Paris: Addressing Climate, Conflict, and Development

2015 was a historic year for international commitments to sustainable development, climate change action, and new kinds of peacebuilding. For governments and policymakers, now comes the difficult task of living up to those commitments.

Gene Editing: A Next Generation Tool for Invasive Species Management?

Biotechnology is a transformative technology, giving rise to a range of new products and applications, including for invasive species management. New developments in gene editing, such as CRISPR-Cas, allow us to easily rewrite sections of an organism’s DNA in a way that promotes the spread of maladaptive traits through a population. These “gene drives” hold promise as a method for controlling or even eradicating major invasive species, such as herbicide-resistant weeds, disease-vectoring mosquitoes, rats on islands, and Asian carps.

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