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Forests

Rule of Law and the Environment: Rights, Resources, and Governance

On January 19, 2016, the University of South Carolina Rule of Law Collaborative, in cooperation with the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, will host "Rule of Law and the Environment: Rights, Resources and Governance," a JusTRAC symposium that will focus on the intersection between rule of law issues and the environment. Discussion will focus on how rule of law plays a role in environmental harm and resource instability and how environment concerns and resource scarcity in turn create rule of law problems. The symposium will bring together leading figures from key U.S.

Climate Change Adaptation and Population Dynamics in Latin America and the Caribbean - Perspectives from the Region

Latin America and the Caribbean face multiple risks from a changing climate, from sea level rise to glacial melt to extreme weather and disease. Recent population trends—particularly population growth and urbanization—will continue to be an important factor in influencing the region’s vulnerability and adaptive capacity. This policy brief shares highlights, key findings and lessons from a series of seminars on climate change adaptation organized by the Wilson Center and U.S. Agency for International Development missions across Latin America and the Caribbean.

The Pioneers of Amazon Research: A Conversation with Dr. John Hemming

The Brazil Institute of the Wilson Center is pleased to invite you to a conversation with renowned British explorer, author, and entrepreneur Dr. John Hemming on “Naturalists in Paradise: Wallace, Bates and Spruce in the Amazon”, his latest book on the great pioneers of Amazon research. The volume details the harrowing journeys in the wilderness of South America’s rain forest of nineteenth century British explorers Alfred Russel Wallace, Henry Walter Bates and Richard Spruce.

Mist of the Earth: Art and Sustainability

 “Mist of the Earth,” an exhibition of photographs and photo-collages by renewed Brazilian artist Denise Milan, joins memory and history and invites viewers on a journey of imagination and reflection about the environmental challenges of development. On May 20, a panel of experts will join the artist to discuss the roles of art in sustainability as the Brazil Institute welcomes “Mist of the Earth” to Washington. A viewing of the artwork with Milan and exhibit Curator Simon Watson will follow.

Telling Tales of Complex Connections

Policy wonks and academics produce voluminous tomes on sustainability issues, but how to get these before a larger audience? One wonkish think tank hard at work on this problem, the Environmental Change and Security Program at the Woodrow Wilson Center, is producing a series of short films to tell the stories that move these concerns toward a wider audience. The idea is to take complex, interacting factors and show how they affect real people.

Global Trends, Local Stories: New Films on India and Ethiopia

On March 24, the DC Environmental Film Festival comes to the Wilson Center for the Washington, DC, premieres of two new short documentaries from ECSP, “Broken Landscape” and “Paving the Way.” Filmmaker and ECSP Multimedia Producer Sean Peoples will describe his journey from the eroded gullies of Ethiopia to the rat-hole mines of northeastern India during a panel discussion led by the Wilson Center’s Roger-Mark De Souza, with observations from Sierra Club's Kim Lovell and World Resources Institute's Ferzina Banaji.
 
About the films:

Environmental Review in Canada and the United States

On March 18, the Wilson Center's Canada Institute hosted Helen Cutts, the vice-president for policy development for the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency, for a round table discussion on the environmental review process in Canada and the United States. Our expert panel gave views from both in and outside government on contrasting procedures, the role sub-federal governments play in the process, how both systems incorporate the needs of native groups into their decision making, and what role concerns about climate change should play in approving or rejecting a project.

Scaling the Mountain: Women, Health, and the Environment in Nepal

From the mountains and foothills of the Himalayas to the Terai plains, climate change is rapidly changing life in Nepal. Many communities however, are not strangers to environmental stress; for decades, rapid population growth alongside agriculture and fuelwood collection have degraded land and diminished forests.

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