Forests | Wilson Center

Forests

Why Do People Move? Research on Environmental Migration Coming of Age

When she finished her dissertation on migration as a response to climate change in 2003, it was one of only a handful of scholarly papers published on the topic that year, said Susana Adamo, an associate research scientist at Columbia University’s Center for International Earth Science Information Network. But in the decade since, interest in climate migration has exploded – in 2012, more than 10 times as many papers were published.

The Great Lakes St. Lawrence Region: Improving Policy Outcomes Through Research and Engagement

The Great Lakes-St Lawrence Basin contains 18 percent of the world's freshwater and is home to 42 million people. While these waters are essential to Canada and the United States' quality of life, the current state and future sustainability of the basin continue to challenge policy makers.

Tracks in the Amazon

When construction of the Madeira-Mamoré Railroad began in 1867, Bolivia had lost its war with Chile, causing it to become landlocked and unable to ship its minerals and other products from the Pacific Coast. Since Bolivia needed to find a way to move products from the Atlantic Coast, the government decided a railroad should be built around the Madeira River--which originates in Bolivia and travels almost 2,000 miles through Brazil to the Amazon--facilitating shipment to foreign markets via the Amazonian waterway.

Forests on Film: New Stories from Nepal and the Congo Basin

Given growing awareness about environmental change and how it affects human life, it is perhaps not surprising there is also a growing audience for environmental filmmaking. At the 2014 Environmental Film Festival in the Nation’s Capital on March 25, the Wilson Center premiered ECSP’s latest documentary, Scaling the Mountain: Protecting Forests for Families in Nepal.

Choke Point: India -- A Wilson Center-Circle of Blue Joint Initiative

On April 2, Circle of Blue and the Wilson Center present the findings of their Choke Point: India initiative, an exploration into the water-energy-food confrontations in the world’s second most populous country.

Climate Change: Science, Impacts, Risks and Response

According to the recently released 5th Assessment Report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), human influence on the climate system is clear and the warming of our climate system is unequivocal. The growing scientific evidence that humans are the leading factor in climate change brings a new understanding of the scope and fragility of our climate.

China Environment Series 12

A Peek Inside This Issue

Gorillas and Family Planning: At the Crossroads of Community Development and Conservation

“Gorillas are very good at family planning; if we were like them, we’d be much better off,” said wildlife veterinarian Dr. Gladys Kalema-Zikusoka at the Wilson Center on September 26.

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