Gender Equality | Wilson Center

Gender Equality

Right to Know: Empowering Youth Through Health and Education

“If we are serious about results, [the Sustainable Development Goals] must be developed from the perspective of the young person, particularly the adolescent girl. It is about her challenges, her rights, and her future. Our collective success begins and ends with her,” said Benoit Kalasa, director of the technical division for the United Nation’s Population Fund at the Wilson Center on October 19.

A River Runs Again: Reporting on India’s Natural Crisis—and Its Surprising Solutions

The world’s second most populous country – projected to be first by 2022 – is developing faster than ever before, roiling the social, political, and environmental landscape.

Finding the Path: Increasing Contraceptive Choice in Africa’s Most Populous Countries

More than 225 million women in developing countries want to avoid or delay pregnancy but are not using safe, modern, and effective contraceptive methods. Such a gap between women’s contraceptive behavior and reproductive goals is called an unmet need for family planning, and no region has more unmet need than sub-Saharan Africa.

Engaging Health Workers in the Global Movement to End Female Genital Mutilation

Aissata M.B. Camara grew up in an educated, upper income household in Guinea, West Africa. One morning, she woke up to singing outside her window and knew they were coming. Many in her community thought that she was unclean and would grow up to be promiscuous if she wasn’t cut. She would be unmarriageable. While her family and community members held her down, she realized, “my body no longer belonged to me.”

The Right IDEA: Engaging Decisionmakers on Family Planning in the Post-2015 World

Just a few years ago, progress on global family planning and reproductive health policy seemed to be stuck in a rut. “For 20 years, development money for health had been directed to fight HIV and poverty, and as a result, momentum, interest, and funding for family planning had dwindled,” said Susan Rich, vice president of global partnerships for the Population Reference Bureau (PRB), at the Wilson Center on July 15.

Roger-Mark De Souza Discusses Family Planning, Empowerment, and the Environment

Colorado has seen a historic drop in the pregnancy rate among teens and poor women, thanks to a pioneering family planning program providing long-acting birth control for free.

Restoring Hope and Dignity: New Developments and Best Practices in Addressing Maternal Morbidities

Obstetric fistula and pelvic organ prolapse are two common maternal morbidities that impact thousands of women in developing countries each year but are often overshadowed by maternal mortalities. Obstetric fistula, a hole in the birth canal caused by obstructed labor, affects between 50,000 and 100,000 women each year, mostly in developing countries. Pelvic organ prolapse, whic

Changing the World: How USAID’s 50 Years of Family Planning has Transformed People, Economies, and the Planet

Since President Lyndon B. Johnson created the USAID population program in 1965, it has evolved in tandem with the global discourse on population and demography. “The agency’s family planning program is as relevant today as it ever was, and is necessary,” said Jennifer Adams, deputy assistant administrator of the U.S. Agency of International Development’s Bureau for Global Health.

The Hillary Doctrine: Sex & American Foreign Policy (Book Launch)

When Valerie Hudson evaluates the strength of a nation, whether food security, wealth, peacefulness, or quality of governance, she finds one important thread that underlies it all. “One of the most important factors in the determination of these things is in fact the situation, and security, and status of women,” said Hudson at the Wilson Center on June 24.

Pages