Gender Equality | Wilson Center

Gender Equality

Women Leaders and Emerging Leaders: A Force Multiplier

As the Council of Women World Leaders celebrates its 15th anniversary and a move to The Wilson Center, Finnish President Tarja Halonen, former Irish President Mary Robinson, and U.N. Special Representative Margot Wallstrom share their stories for the next generation.

 

Paving a Way for Women in Brazil

NEW YORK — Tall and tan, blond and flashy, the model Gisele Bündchen has been for most of the world the seductive image of today’s Brazilian women, strutting down fashion runways in Paris, Milan and New York, while her face graces scores of magazine covers.

Now there’s a new image, a new face.

Progress for Women, but a Long Way to Go

The Struggle for Equality: Can We Close the Global Gender Gap?

When it comes to equality between the sexes, women have made dramatic strides in recent decades. In spite of that good news, a significant gender gap persists, particularly in two critical areas: economic equality and political power. For example, while women account for more than half of the world's population, they hold fewer than 20 percent of all decision-making national positions according to the World Economic Forum's Global Gender Gap Report 2011.

“Between Marketization and Social Protection: Ambivalences of Feminism in the Context of Capitalist Crisis”

Nancy Fraser is one of the leading political philosophers and feminist theorists practicing today. Her writing addresses issues of concern to a broad audience, including globalization, cosmopolitanism, identity politics, neoliberalism, the welfare state, and gender issues.

Improving Maternal Health: A Conversation with Kenyan Field Workers and Policymakers

“The traditional strategies for improving the health system include the horizontal approach, which prioritizes non-communicable diseases, and the vertical approach which prioritizes communicable diseases such as HIV/AIDS,” said John Townsend, vice president of reproductive health programs at Population Council, during a webcast discussion between the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington, DC, and maternal health experts in Nairobi, Kenya.

Women, Migration and the Work of Care: The United States in Comparative Perspective

Native-born American workers are not meeting current U.S. demands for care workers, whether for children, the elderly, or those with chronic illnesses. As a result, there are significant opportunities for migrant workers--opportunities to which women from many parts of the globe are responding. But because U.S. immigration quotas are not in synch with these needs, many potential care workers are entering the country without documentation. Temporary care work programs--though not unproblematic--may be the answer.

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