Gender

Gender and Islam in Africa: New Book from Wilson Center Senior Scholar Margot Badran

Wilson Center Senior Scholar Margot Badran is the editor of a new book published jointly by the Woodrow Wilson Center Press and Stanford University Press. Gender and Islam in Africa: Rights, Sexuality, and Law examines ways in which women in Africa are interpreting traditional Islamic concepts in order to empower themselves and their societies.

About

Since 1994, the Environmental Change and Security Program (ECSP) has actively pursued the connections between the environment, health, population, development, conflict, and security. ECSP brings together scholars, policymakers, media, and practitioners through events, research, publications, multimedia content, and our award-winning blog, New Security Beat.

ECSP currently has three primary focus areas:

USAID/Egypt Health and Population: Legacy Review and the Way Forward

A panel of speakers discussed the long-term effects of USAID initiatives in Egypt, as reported in a new "Legacy Review," which details the past 30 years of USAID health sector assistance in Egypt.

Yemen Beyond the Headlines: Population, Health, Natural Resources, and Institutions

"Ultimately, whether Yemen is able to achieve its goals for social and economic development, will, to a large extent, depend on its future population growth and size," said Gary Cook, senior health advisor at the U.S. Agency for International Development, in his opening address at the Woodrow Wilson Center's all-day conference, "Yemen Behind the Headlines: Population, Health, Natural Resources, and Institutions."

Panel I: Population and Development Challenges

Gender and Islam in Africa: Rights, Sexuality, and Law

Gender and Islam in Africa examines ways in which women in Africa are interpreting traditional Islamic concepts in order to empower themselves and their societies. African women, it argues, have promoted the ideals and practices of equality, human rights, and democracy within the framework of Islamic thought, challenging conventional conceptualizations of the religion as gender-constricted and patriarchal.

Contemporary Women's Movements in Hungary: Globalization, Democracy, and Gender Equality

As the first and only book in any language on contemporary women’s movements in Hungary, this groundbreaking study focuses on the role of women’s activism in a society where women are not yet adequately represented by established parties and political institutions. Drawing on eyewitness accounts of meetings and protests, as well as first-person interviews with leading female activists, Katalin Fábián examines the interactions between women’s groups in Hungary and studies the unique brand of democracy they have forged in postcommunist Eastern Europe.

Enterprising Women in Urban Zimbabwe: Gender, Microbusiness, and Globalization

Based on a series of interviews conducted throughout the 1990s, Enterprising Women in Urban Zimbabwe discusses the business and personal experiences of women entrepreneurs in the cities of Harare and Bulawayo, who worked in the market trade, crocheting, sewing, and hairdressing professions of the microenterprise sector.

Kinship and Capitalism: Marriage, Family, and Business in the English-speaking World, 1580-1740

This uncompromisingly empirical study reconstructs the public and private lives of urban business families during the period of England’s emergence as a world economic power. Using a broad cross-section of archival, rather than literary, sources, it tests the orthodox view that the family as an institution was transformed by capitalism and individualism. The approach is both quantitative and qualitative. A database of 28,000 families has been constructed to tackle questions such as demographic structure, kinship, and inheritance, which must be answered statistically.

Pages