Global Governance | Wilson Center

Global Governance

The International Response to the Rwandan Genocide – a Failure of Humanity

"Are all humans human or are some humans more human than others?" General Dallaire began his speech by posing this provocative, haunting question. He followed on with the point and question: In the context of the fact that 80 percent of humanity is living in absolute poverty with no hope and no dignity, can we say that humanity is advancing? Dallaire answers this second question with an unqualified No.

The Democratic Republic of the Congo: A Peace-Building Update

Ambassador Swing gave a detailed briefing of the current and planned activities of the UN Observer Mission to the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUC). Excluding the mission in Liberia (UNMIL), MONUC is the largest of 16 UN Missions in the world with a total peace keeping budget of $641million. It is one of the largest and most complex missions of the United Nations to date, with over ten thousand troops, seven hundred sixty military observers, and over a hundred nationalities involved.

Director's Forum with Bill Clinton

President Clinton focused his talk on his recent two-week trip to Africa, during which he visited five nations: Mozambique, Rwanda, Ghana, Nigeria, and South Africa. Given his stated interest in economically empowering poor communities around the world, Clinton visited Africa to continue his work to promote HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention, democratization, and economic development. Other areas he has actively pursued since leaving office that were among the themes promoted on his Africa trip included racial and ethnic reconciliation; citizen participation; and education.

Northeast Asia on the Path to Copenhagen

On November 17, the Asia Program and the China Environment Forum hosted a two-panel event on how nations in northeast Asia are preparing for the United Nations Conference on Climate Change to take place in Copenhagen this December.

Panel One: China's Green Revolution

Land Grab: The Race for the World's Farmland

The world is experiencing a grain rush. With increasing frequency, wealthy, food-importing, and water-scarce countries—particularly the Arab Gulf states and the rich countries of East Asia—are investing in farmland overseas to meet food security needs. Similarly, the private sector is pursuing farmland deals abroad, with many investors perceiving land as a safe investment in an otherwise shaky financial climate.

The Road to Copenhagen: Perspectives on Brazil, China and India

A lone ranger mindset inflicting both developed and developing countries stands in the way of a significant reduction of carbons emissions, but the world will eventually have to put differences aside in order to reach an agreement on climate change, according to a panel with experts on Brazil, China, and India who convened in anticipation of the upcoming UN Convention in Copenhagen.

Taking Stock of Carbon Emissions: Policies, Strategies, and Tools for the U.S. and China

Over the past year, the Chinese government has been aggressively promoting low carbon policies to help ensure China's energy security and lower the country's greenhouse gas emissions. At the Copenhagen climate meeting in December 2009, the Chinese leadership committed the country to ambitious CO2 emissions targets.

U.S. Intelligence Estimates on Latin American Revolutionary Movements, 1947-1987

The Cold War International History Project and the Latin American Program of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars presents U.S. Intelligence Estimates on Latin American Revolutionary Movements, 1947-1987.

The History of the Gas Centrifuge and Its Role in Nuclear Proliferation

The discovery of A.Q. Khan's extensive nuclear proliferation network based upon gas centrifuge technology used to enrich uranium to weapons-grade has created a crisis of confidence in the non-proliferation regime. While the beginnings of gas-centrifuge experimentation date back to the 1930s, it was only in the 1970s that the technology advanced enough to become commercially viable. Widely considered an unlikely path to nuclear weapons proliferation until the 1990s, gas-centrifuge technology is now seen by some as a central threat to the non-proliferation regime.

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