Global Health

Health in the City: New Strategies to Meet the Needs of Urban Africa

More than half the world’s population is now urban, and more than a quarter of the 100 fastest-growing cities are in Africa. Though urbanization is often associated with improved health, African cities are struggling to cope with the demands of growing populations. Poor women and children in African cities are the least likely socioeconomic groups to have access to preventive health services.

Right to Know: Empowering Youth Through Health and Education

“If we are serious about results, [the Sustainable Development Goals] must be developed from the perspective of the young person, particularly the adolescent girl. It is about her challenges, her rights, and her future. Our collective success begins and ends with her,” said Benoit Kalasa, director of the technical division for the United Nation’s Population Fund at the Wilson Center on October 19.

A River Runs Again: Reporting on India’s Natural Crisis—and Its Surprising Solutions

The world’s second most populous country – projected to be first by 2022 – is developing faster than ever before, roiling the social, political, and environmental landscape.

Finding the Path: Increasing Contraceptive Choice in Africa’s Most Populous Countries

More than 225 million women in developing countries want to avoid or delay pregnancy but are not using safe, modern, and effective contraceptive methods. Such a gap between women’s contraceptive behavior and reproductive goals is called an unmet need for family planning, and no region has more unmet need than sub-Saharan Africa.

Leveraging the Private Sector to Strengthen Maternal Health

In 2013, nearly 300,000 women died during pregnancy and childbirth. The majority of those deaths were in developing countries and entirely preventable. Much of the effort towards reducing this number has been focused on what governments should do differently, but the private sector plays just as important a role as the public sector, said a panel of experts at the Wilson Center on September 17

Engaging Health Workers in the Global Movement to End Female Genital Mutilation

Aissata M.B. Camara grew up in an educated, upper income household in Guinea, West Africa. One morning, she woke up to singing outside her window and knew they were coming. Many in her community thought that she was unclean and would grow up to be promiscuous if she wasn’t cut. She would be unmarriageable. While her family and community members held her down, she realized, “my body no longer belonged to me.”

Keep the Golden Years Shining: The Challenges of Long-Term Elderly Care in Japan and Beyond

Japan has one of the most rapidly ageing populations in the world, coupled with a falling birth rate. The fiscal, political, and social challenges facing public agencies, communities, and families to take care of elderly people are becoming ever more urgent. But the hurdles facing Japan are hardly unique. Other industrialized nations in Asia and beyond are facing similar challenges. Join us for a discussion on the dilemma of balancing formal and informal care amid changing demographic realities.

Managing Our Planet Series

Managing Our Plant Series 2011-2017
 

The Managing Our Planet series is developed jointly by the Brazil Institute, Environmental Change and Security Program and the George Mason University. It is based on the premise that the impacts of humanity on the environment (including natural resources) are planetary in scale. The series addresses planetary-scale problems and solutions.

A Prescription for a Secure Pakistan: Why Health is Vital for National Security and Economic Development

Pakistan faces many health challenges, including high infant mortality rates. Pakistan’s population growth and birth rates—the highest in South Asia—complicate efforts to provide quality and accessible health care to its citizenry. This event will address Pakistan’s health challenges, with an emphasis on maternal and child health and nutrition, and highlight the implications for stability and economic growth.

Roger-Mark De Souza on Climate Adaptation and Reproductive Health in Latin America

Giving women control over their own reproductive health - how many kids they have, and when they choose to have them - can be transformative for women, families, and entire communities. In a recent interview with NexusMedia, Roger-Mark De Souza connects the transformative power of family planning to climate adaptation efforts in Latin America. In Peru, for instance, where water shortages are prompting rural families to move to urban slums, families struggle to find new livelihoods. Too often, even though families need multiple incomes women have to forgo work to take care of children.

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