History

India and Pakistan: The First Fifty Years

One fifth of the world’s people live in India and Pakistan. Looking back on their first fifty years of independence, leading specialists on South Asia assess their progress and problems, their foreign and defense policies and their relations with the United States. The three coeditors, who compare the achievements of India and Pakistan in a perceptive introductory overview, combine journalistic, diplomatic and academic experience

In addition to these explorations and comparisons of internal issues, the final chapter reviews U.S. relations with India and Pakistan.

Churchill as Peacemaker

Winston Churchill had an acute appreciation of what belongs to war and what belongs to peace. We tend to remember his resistance to Nazi tyranny during the Second World War and his actions as a man of war. In this book, scholars from the United States, Great Britain, and South Africa examine his other actions and comments, those that reflect the primary focus of Churchill’s long career: his attempts to keep and restore peace throughout the world, from Queen Victoria’s little wars to the Cold War.

For Democracy's Sake: Foundations and Democracy Assistance in Central Europe

Assisting democracy has become a major concern of the international community since the end of the cold war. Not only governments, but private actors—foundations and other nongovernmental organizations—are playing a growing role in these efforts, rivaling that of governments and international institutions. This pathbreaking study examines foundations’ democracy assistance programs in Central Europe in the years immediately following the fall of the Berlin Wall, both measuring their size and evaluating their strategies.

The Crisis in Kashmir: Portents of War, Hopes of Peace

This book traces the origins of the insurgency in Indian-controlled Jammu and Kashmir. The first theoretically-grounded account, and the most complete, it is based on extensive interviews. Ganguly’s central argument is that the insurgency can be explained by political mobilization and institutional decay. In an attempt to woo the Muslims, the government dramatically expanded literacy, mass media, and higher education. Meanwhile, fearing potential secessionist proclivities, it stifled the development of political institutions.

American Diplomacy and the End of the Cold War: An Insider's Account of U.S. Policy in Europe, 1989-1992

As director for European affairs at the National Security Council from 1989 to 1992, Robert Hutchings was at the heart of U.S. policymaking toward Europe and the Soviet Union during the dizzyingly fast dissolution of the Soviet bloc. American Diplomacy and the End of the Cold War presents an insider's report on and analysis of U.S. performance during a crucial turn of world history.

The Politics of Elections in Southeast Asia

Though most governments in Southeast Asia are widely described as authoritarian, elections have been a feature of politics in the region for many decades. This volume, bringing together eleven separate studies by leading authorities, examines the countries that have conducted multi-party elections since the 1940s and 1950s—Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Thailand, Cambodia, Burma/Myanmar, and Singapore. It identifies the common and distinguishing features of electoral politics in the region.

Race: The History of an Idea in the West

In Race: The History of an Idea in the West, Ivan Hannaford guides readers through a dangerous engagement with an idea that so permeates Western thinking that we expect to find it, active or dormant, as an organizing principle in all societies. But as Hannaford shows, race is not a universal idea--not even in the West. It is an idea with a definite pedigree, and Hannaford traces that confused pedigree from Hesiod to the Holocaust and beyond.

Issues of Historical Preservation in Central Europe and Russia, Conference Proceedings (1994)

Washington, D.C.: Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars; Kennan Institute Occasional Paper Series #259, 1994. PDF 90 pages.

Origins of Terrorism: Psychologies, Ideologies, Theologies, States of Mind

Terrorists and terrorism have become a major force internationally. Hostage-taking and other acts of violence for political ends are common all over the globe. This groundbreaking study sheds new light on the phenomenon of terrorism.

This book examines and explains the nature and sources of terrorists’ beliefs, actions, goals, worldviews, and states of mind. Origins of Terrorism addresses, with scholarly responsibility as well as necessary urgency, one of the most vexing intellectual and political challenges of our time.

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