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History

Behind Asia’s Other Trade War

While the trade war between Washington and Beijing has garnered significant attention, another trade war between two of the world’s largest and most advanced economies is heating up. Japan and South Korea are the world’s third- and twelfth-largest economies, respectively, representing an annual GDP of greater than $6.5 trillion. Yet trade friction between Tokyo and Seoul has intensified as a political standoff, rooted in history and inflamed by domestic politics on both sides, has begun to impact the economies of two critical American allies and global supply chains.

Call for Papers - NATO: Past and Present

Nontraditional Strategy Building: A Mapping of Cultural Movements in the Indo-Pacific

Article Fourteen of the Japanese Constitution enshrines equality before the law regardless of "race, creed, sex, social status or family origin." Article Fifteen of the Indian Constitution guarantees a right to equality no matter an individual’s “religion, race, caste, sex or place of birth.” Even the People’s Republic of China includes a constitutional provision that promises its citizens legal equality.

Intellectuals and Fascism in Interwar Romania: The Criterion Association

In 1930s Bucharest, some of the country’s most brilliant young intellectuals converged to form the Criterion Association. Bound by friendship and the dream of a new, modern Romania, their members included historian Mircea Eliade, critic Petru Comarnescu, Jewish playwright Mihail Sebastian and a host of other philosophers and artists. Together, they built a vibrant cultural scene that flourished for a few short years, before fascism and scandal splintered their ranks. Cristina A.

How Past Wars Shape the Present in China, Russia, and North Korea

In this edition of Wilson Center NOW we speak with Wilson Fellow Katie Stallard-Blanchette about her project “Dancing on Bones,” a book-length investigation of how China, Russia, and North Korea exploit their wartime past to secure contemporary regime legitimacy, and justify aggressive foreign policy. 

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