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History

From Alignment to Non-Alignment: Yugoslavia Discovers the Third World

Yugoslavia set the pace of political developments inside the Non-Aligned Movement and around the Third World during the Cold War era. And unlike other non-aligned countries during this period, Yugoslavia’s non-alignment was neither a product of anti-colonial revolution nor of post-colonial defiance to former masters.

The South China Sea in Strategic Terms

In recent years, U.S. military planners have shifted their focus from counterterrorism, low intensity conflict to great power, high intensity threats.  The most likely single scenario for a major military engagement against a great power adversary would be one against China centered on the South China Sea.  There are certainly other situations involving other challenges, but this is the most plausible and dangerous.  Any such assertion must rest on an understanding that critical U.S.

Book Talk: Zuleikha

First published in Russia in 2015, Zuleikha Opens Her Eyes tells a story of survival and renewal during the 1930s Soviet policy of dekulakization and exile, taking the title character on the harrowing journey from a Tatar village to East Siberia. To mark the publication of the English translation of her critically acclaimed novel, award-winning Russian author of Tatar origin Guzel Yakhina discussed the family history she drew inspiration from as well as Russia’s tragic past that provides context for her book.

From Prewar to Postwar: How Ordinary Germans Experienced the 20th Century

In this edition of Wilson Center NOW we are joined by author Konrad H. Jarausch who discusses his latest book, “Broken Lives: How Ordinary Germans Experienced the Twentieth Century.” Jarausch explores how ordinary German citizens fell for Nazi propaganda and often perpetrated or collaborated in the regime’s crimes. He also explores how the defeated survivors were able to recivilize themselves, becoming democrats and Western allies.

Guest

Kissinger on Kissinger: Reflections on Diplomacy, Grand Strategy, and Leadership

As National Security Advisor to Richard Nixon, Henry Kissinger transformed America's approach to diplomacy with China, the USSR, Vietnam, and the Middle East, laying the foundations for geopolitics as we know them today. Nearly fifty years later, escalating tensions between the US, China, and Russia are threatening a swift return to the same diplomatic game of tug-of-war that Kissinger played so masterfully.

The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War

After more than fifteen years of research, historian Joanne Freeman - a leading authority on early American political culture - has uncovered roughly seventy physically violent incidents in the antebellum Congress, most of them long forgotten.  Fistfights, guns and knives, out-and-out brawls: essentially censored out of the period's equivalent of the Congressional Record

Dr. Hope M. Harrison: 30th Anniversary of the Fall of the Berlin Wall

Dr. Hope Harrison was a Public Policy Fellow with the History and Public Policy Program as well as the Cold War International History Project at the Wilson Center in Washington, D.C. from June 2014 to October 2016. She is an Associate Professor of History & International Affairs at George Washington University’s Elliott School of International Affairs. Her focuses are on the Berlin Wall, Germany, international history of the Cold War, and Russian foreign policy. She is also the author of the award-winning book Driving the Soviets up the Wall (Princeton Univ. Press, 2003).

The Normalization of Kim Jong Un – what Kim gains from visit to Russia

Just over a year ago, Kim Jong Un crossed the border into China on his armored train on his way to meet Xi Jinping in Beijing. It was the first time he had left North Korea since becoming leader, and his first meeting with another head of state.

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