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Human Rights

Ruslan Garipov: Indigenous Peoples’ Protection in International Law; Indigenous Peoples’ Rights Protection in Russia and the US

A fellow at the Polar Institute from September 2018 to August 2019, Ruslan Garipov is an Adjunct Professor at American University School of International Service. His interest and expertise are in the field of indigenous peoples’ rights. Ruslan Garipov is the author of Indigenous Peoples’ Protection in International Law (Kazan Federal University, 2012); Indigenous Peoples’ Rights Protection in Russia and the US (Tatar State University of Humanities and Education, 2010) and many articles in peer-reviewed law journals.

Sharia and the State in Pakistan: Blasphemy Politics

This book analyses the formulation, interpretation and implementation of sharia in Pakistan and its relationship with the Pakistani state whilst addressing the complexity of sharia as a codified set of laws.

Sovereignty Experiments: Korean Migrants and the Building of Borders in Northeast Asia, 1860-1945

Sovereignty Experiments tells the story of how authorities in Korea, Russia, China, and Japan―through diplomatic negotiations, border regulations, legal categorization of subjects and aliens, and cultural policies―competed to control Korean migrants as they suddenly moved abroad by the thousands in the late nineteenth century. Alyssa M.

At the United Nations, Brazil Allies with Ultra-Conservatives on Gender and Sex-Ed

Brazil sided with unusual allies at a recent United Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC) meeting in Geneva, underscoring just how much Brazil’s international stance on human rights and gender equality has shifted under the Bolsonaro administration. At the UNHRC’s 41st session, held from June 24 to July 12, the 47-member council adopted a slew of resolutions covering a wide range of issues, from the human rights situation in Eritrea to the impact of corruption on human rights.

Post-Protests, The Dilemma Remains Unsolved in Hong Kong

After two million Hong Kong residents, more than one-fourth of the city’s population, took to the streets to protest against a bill allowing extradition to China, Governor Carrie Lam apologized to the people of Hong Kong and suspended the legislative process of the bill. This massive demonstration on June 16th, largely peaceful, followed violent conflicts between protestors and the police on June 12th, which had blocked a second reading of the bill. Although intermittent protests are still occurring in Hong Kong, large-scale conflicts have been relatively settled.

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