Human Rights | Wilson Center

Human Rights

U.S. Leadership Needed on Syrian Refugee Crisis

Sixty percent of Syria’s population are either refugees or internally displaced.  Of those thirteen million Syrians, nearly six million are refugees who fled to neighboring Middle Eastern nations—five times more than the one million in Europe and the U.S.

Interview with Robeyoncé Lima, a Voice for Pernambuco’s LGBTQ+

This interview is also available in Portuguese, following the English version below / A entrevista está disponível em português, sob a versão em inglês.
 

Strengthening Egypt’s Refugee Programs

Over the past two years the number of registered refugees and asylum seekers in Egypt has increased by 21 percent. Today, Egypt is among the highest destination countries in Africa receiving documented and undocumented immigrants. Many are African, Yemeni, or Syrian refugees fleeing political instability, conflict, and civil war.

Strengthening Refugee and Host Communities: Livelihoods, Education, and Social Protections

As the Global Compact on Refugees notes, millions of refugees “live in protracted situations, often in low- and middle-income countries facing their own economic and development challenges.” According to UNHCR, almost 12.2 million Syrians in the Middle East either are refugees in neighboring host countries or internally displaced. Eight years into the Syrian conflict, the refugee crisis continues to put economic and political pressures on host communities and international actors.

Event Recap: What's Next for the Rohingya?

The Rohingya Crises may have faded from the headlines but the plight of the Rohingya remains uncertain. On April 2nd, 2019, the Asia Program hosted Dr. Nehginpao Kipgen, one of the foremost experts on Burma and the Executive Director at the Center for Southeast Asian Studies at the Jindal Global University in India to discuss recent developments with the Rohingya Community what could be in store for them in the future. In this capacity, Dr.

Algeria’s Slim Chance for Civilian Rule

After twenty years in power, Algerian President Abdelaziz Boutefika is the latest Arab leader to succumb to a popular uprising of massive discontent, bowing on April 2 to the street and his own military’s demand that he resign immediately.  Four other Arab strongmen met the same fate for the same reason in 2011, and each time the result has been short-term political chaos (Tunisia and Egypt) or long-term civil war (Libya and Yemen).  

Political Imprisonment in Russia: Motives, Tools, and Trends

Conservative estimates suggest that there are about 250 political prisoners in Russia today. These prisoners—which include human rights activists, journalists, representatives of religious groups, and many others—have fallen victim to Russia’s vague and highly flexible criminal code. Sergey Davidis, head of the political prisoners support program at the Memorial Human Rights Center, offered his assessment of this situation and an outlook for the future.

Remembering the Rohingya

The plight of the Rohingya community is one of the saddest, and most underreported, stories of modern times.

This Muslim community has long suffered through persecution, marginalization, and mass migration. Its numbers are highest in Burma—about a million, according to most estimates—but they also live on the fringes of society in India and in many countries across the Muslim world.

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