Human Rights | Wilson Center

Human Rights

The Nuremberg Idea: Crimes against Humanity in History, Law & Politics

“The Nuremberg Idea” offers a historically-informed answer to one of the key social theory questions of our time: How did “human rights” become a concept that even the most heinous regimes feel they need to buy into? In tackling this question through the vector of the term “crimes against humanity,” this history offers a new transdisciplinary analysis of how human rights norms are formed, transmitted, and sustained, both domestically and at the supra-national level.

The Russian Penitentiary System: Civil Society’s Unintended Incubator

Prison and exile have featured prominently in the biographies of nearly every well-known Russian cultural figure. Importantly, the shared experience of prison or exile has helped to shape each individual’s civic position. This tradition continues in Russia today, where discontent with the widespread miscarriage of justice serves as a social catalyst for tens of thousands of Russians and may ultimately help lay the foundation for democratic change.

Trajectories of Inequality in Brazil

The challenges Brazil faces nowadays, in particular the ongoing crisis of governance and a deep economic recession, raise important questions about the country’ s capacity to preserve impressive gains it made in recent decades to reduce historically high levels of social, economic,  and political inequalies. This is the context of a daylong seminar the Brazil Institute of the Wilson Center will convene on February 16, in partnership with the University of São Paulo Centro de Estudos da Metrópole and the São Paulo Science Foundation (FAPESP).

Across the Lines of Conflict: Facilitating Cooperation to Build Peace

This volume presents peacebuilding initiatives that engage local leaders from opposing sides in intensive interactive workshops, comparing six cases from small, ethnically divided countries—Burundi, Cyprus, Estonia, Guyana, Sri Lanka, and Tajikistan. All six initiatives were guided by outside third parties who worked to enhance interpersonal cohesion and ability to collaborate among local leaders and other actors.

Women on the Run: The Looming Refugee Crisis

A new UNHCR report, “Women on the Run,” provides first-hand accounts of women from the Northern Triangle region (El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras) who are seeking asylum in the US as part of a looming refugee crisis. Their struggles are part of a larger story effecting hundreds of thousands more. The need for a regional response to the growing problem provides the focus for this edition of REWIND.

Update on Europe’s Migration Crisis

With Europe experiencing a migration crisis on a scale not seen since World War II, we spoke with Professor James Hollifield for an update on the situation. He recently returned from Europe and provides a firsthand account of the ongoing humanitarian and political crisis. That’s the focus of this edition of  Wilson Center NOW.
 

Follow-Up to the Investigations of the Disappearance of 43 Students in Iguala, Guerrero, Mexico

In September 2014, a group of 43 students from a teachers college disappeared in the southern Mexican city of Iguala in the state of Guerrero. Their disappearance left Mexicans horrified and outraged, shocked the international community, and led to nationwide protests.

Investigating the Disappearance of the 43 Students in Mexico

The Office of Congressman Alan Lowenthal, the Washington Office on Latin America (WOLA), and the Mexico Institute of the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars are pleased to invite you to a briefing on:

Investigating the Disappearance of the 43 Students in Mexico

Pages