Human Rights | Wilson Center

Human Rights

Offsite Event: Confronting Mexico's Mounting Human Rights Challenges

OFFSITE LOCATION: 
2456 Rayburn House Office Building
Friday, March 18, 2016
10:00am-11:00am

 

Addressing Loss and Damage: Innovative Climate Finance Solutions

The world is entering a new phase of climate change defined by “failure to mitigate sufficiently and failure to adapt sufficiently,” said Saleemul Huq, director of the Bangladesh-based International Center for Climate Change and Development, at the Wilson Center on March 16.

The Unintended Consequences of Counter-trafficking Programs in Moldova

In response to increased concern over sex trafficking from Moldova to Turkey, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) launched a variety of counter-trafficking campaigns. Drawing on 15 months of transnational, ethnographic research in Moldova and Turkey, Dr. Leyla Keough will show how these campaigns have had unintended, adverse effects on many women and families. Using excerpts from her new book, Worker-Mothers in the Margins of Europe: Gender and Migration between Moldova and Istanbul (2015, Woodrow Wilson and Indiana University Press), Dr.

Feasts for Eyes Too Blind to See: Destroying Communities in the Name of Ideology

The end – as Nomvuyo Ngcelwane would recall decades later in her memoirs Sala Kahle District Six: An African Woman’s Perspective – proved to be unremarkable. One early October day in 1963, an ungainly truck rumbled up to 22 Cross Street in Cape Town’s District Six, in the heart of one of the most diverse neighborhoods on the African continent.

The Nuremberg Idea: Crimes against Humanity in History, Law & Politics

“The Nuremberg Idea” offers a historically-informed answer to one of the key social theory questions of our time: How did “human rights” become a concept that even the most heinous regimes feel they need to buy into? In tackling this question through the vector of the term “crimes against humanity,” this history offers a new transdisciplinary analysis of how human rights norms are formed, transmitted, and sustained, both domestically and at the supra-national level.

The Russian Penitentiary System: Civil Society’s Unintended Incubator

Prison and exile have featured prominently in the biographies of nearly every well-known Russian cultural figure. Importantly, the shared experience of prison or exile has helped to shape each individual’s civic position. This tradition continues in Russia today, where discontent with the widespread miscarriage of justice serves as a social catalyst for tens of thousands of Russians and may ultimately help lay the foundation for democratic change.

Trajectories of Inequality in Brazil

The challenges Brazil faces nowadays, in particular the ongoing crisis of governance and a deep economic recession, raise important questions about the country’ s capacity to preserve impressive gains it made in recent decades to reduce historically high levels of social, economic,  and political inequalies. This is the context of a daylong seminar the Brazil Institute of the Wilson Center will convene on February 16, in partnership with the University of São Paulo Centro de Estudos da Metrópole and the São Paulo Science Foundation (FAPESP).

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