Human Rights | Wilson Center

Human Rights

Across the Lines of Conflict: Facilitating Cooperation to Build Peace

This volume presents peacebuilding initiatives that engage local leaders from opposing sides in intensive interactive workshops, comparing six cases from small, ethnically divided countries—Burundi, Cyprus, Estonia, Guyana, Sri Lanka, and Tajikistan. All six initiatives were guided by outside third parties who worked to enhance interpersonal cohesion and ability to collaborate among local leaders and other actors.

Women on the Run: The Looming Refugee Crisis

A new UNHCR report, “Women on the Run,” provides first-hand accounts of women from the Northern Triangle region (El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras) who are seeking asylum in the US as part of a looming refugee crisis. Their struggles are part of a larger story effecting hundreds of thousands more. The need for a regional response to the growing problem provides the focus for this edition of REWIND.

Update on Europe’s Migration Crisis

With Europe experiencing a migration crisis on a scale not seen since World War II, we spoke with Professor James Hollifield for an update on the situation. He recently returned from Europe and provides a firsthand account of the ongoing humanitarian and political crisis. That’s the focus of this edition of  Wilson Center NOW.
 

Follow-Up to the Investigations of the Disappearance of 43 Students in Iguala, Guerrero, Mexico

In September 2014, a group of 43 students from a teachers college disappeared in the southern Mexican city of Iguala in the state of Guerrero. Their disappearance left Mexicans horrified and outraged, shocked the international community, and led to nationwide protests.

Investigating the Disappearance of the 43 Students in Mexico

The Office of Congressman Alan Lowenthal, the Washington Office on Latin America (WOLA), and the Mexico Institute of the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars are pleased to invite you to a briefing on:

Investigating the Disappearance of the 43 Students in Mexico

Engaging Health Workers in the Global Movement to End Female Genital Mutilation

Aissata M.B. Camara grew up in an educated, upper income household in Guinea, West Africa. One morning, she woke up to singing outside her window and knew they were coming. Many in her community thought that she was unclean and would grow up to be promiscuous if she wasn’t cut. She would be unmarriageable. While her family and community members held her down, she realized, “my body no longer belonged to me.”

Pages