International Development | Wilson Center

International Development

About

Since 1994, the Environmental Change and Security Program (ECSP) has actively pursued the connections between the environment, health, population, development, conflict, and security. ECSP brings together scholars, policymakers, media, and practitioners through events, research, publications, multimedia content, and our award-winning blog, New Security Beat.

ECSP currently has three primary focus areas:

Helping Hands: An Integrated Approach

At the moment, the agendas of the growing population of people and the environment are too separate. People are thinking about one or the other," said Sir John Sulston, Nobel laureate and chair of the Institute for Science, Ethics, and Innovation at the University of Manchester, in an interview with the Environmental Change & Security Program(ECSP).

"People argue about, ‘Should we consume less or should we have fewer people?' The point is it's both. We need to draw it together. It's people and their activities."

Yemen Beyond the Headlines: Population, Health, Natural Resources, and Institutions

"Ultimately, whether Yemen is able to achieve its goals for social and economic development, will, to a large extent, depend on its future population growth and size," said Gary Cook, senior health advisor at the U.S. Agency for International Development, in his opening address at the Woodrow Wilson Center's all-day conference, "Yemen Behind the Headlines: Population, Health, Natural Resources, and Institutions."

Panel I: Population and Development Challenges

Waging Peace: The Inextricable Links Between Security and Development

"The real purpose of me writing this book, over the course of 9 years, was to fundamentally connect with young doers," said Rye Barcott, authour of, "It Happened on the Way to War." Barcott, a former Marine, who writes about his experiences as an impressionable student in Kenya, and a front-line warrior in Iraq, and the journey in between, went further and said that his was a story about social entrepreneurship and military service, and how the two clashed and converged in his heart and mind.

So Much Aid, So Little Development: Stories from Pakistan

Pakistan has received more than $20 billion in external development assistance but has made little evident improvement in its social indicators. So Much Aid, So Little Development offers a fresh explanation for this outcome.

Managing the Planet's Freshwater

"The impact of human activities on the planet and on its biology has risen to a scale that deserves a commensurate response," said Tom Lovejoy, professor at George Mason University, introducing a discussion on "Managing the Planet's Freshwater," the second of a monthly series led jointly by George Mason University and the Woodrow Wilson Center. Karin M.

Deforestation, Population, and Development in a Warming World: A Roundtable on Latin America

"Rural development and MCH [maternal child health] in the most remote, rural areas are going to largely explain the future of Latin American conservation, development, population, and urbanization," said David Lopez-Carr, associate professor of geography at the University of California, Santa Barbara."

Obama Administration Relations with Central America: A Conversation with Seven U.S. Ambassadors

"Central America is in the news a lot these days, often for the wrong reasons," Cynthia Arnson, director of the Latin American Program at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, noted in her introduction to "Obama Administration Relations with Central America: A Conversation with Seven U.S. Ambassadors." Organized crime has flourished while the robust economic recovery enjoyed by South America has bypassed Central America and Mexico; meanwhile, the region's proximity to the United States has spotlighted immigration and trade issues.

U.S. Energy Security Policy: A Global Perspective

"Open energy markets—which is the ability of oil and gas to flow to the purchaser—is really the core of our energy security," said David Goldwyn, the State Department's special envoy for international energy affairs. Making sure markets are open, fair, and transparent is one of five tenets of the administration's global energy security agenda that he discussed at a January 11 Director's Forum.

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