International Development | Wilson Center

International Development

Crime and Violence in Latin America: Citizen Security, Democracy, and the State

By virtually any standard of measurement, Latin America ranks as one of the most violent regions in the world. Violence and crime pose serious threats to the relatively fragile democracies of Latin America and the Caribbean. This volume offers timely discussion by attorneys, government officials, policy analysts, and academics from the United States and Latin America of the responses of the state, civil society, and the international community to these threats.

Environmental Peacemaking

How can environmental cooperation be used to bolster regional peace? A large body of research suggests that environmental degradation may catalyze violent conflict. Environmental cooperation, in contrast, has gone almost unexplored as a means of peacemaking, even though it opens several effective channels: enhancing trust, establishing habits of cooperation, lengthening the time horizons of decisionmakers, forging cooperative trans-societal linkages, and creating shared regional norms and identities.

The United States and Pakistan, 1947-2000: Disenchanted Allies

U.S.-Pakistan relations have been extraordinarily volatile, largely a function of the twists and turns of the Cold War. An intimate partnership prevailed in the Eisenhower, Nixon, and Reagan years, and friction during the Kennedy, Johnson, and Carter presidencies. Since the Cold War ended, the partnership has shriveled. The blunt talking to delivered by President Clinton to Pakistan’s military dictator during Clinton’s March 25, 2000, stopover in Pakistan highlighted U.S.-Pakistani differences. But the Clinton visit also underscored important U.S. interests in Pakistan.

Combating Corruption in Latin America

Corruption persists as a challenge to the consolidation of Latin American democracies and to their economic development. Contrary to many expectations, policies to reduce the size of government, such as the privatization of state firms, have not proved a cure against corruption. In some cases, economic liberalization seems only to have worsened the problem.

Director's Forum with Ambassador Chrétien

Remarks Introducing Canadian Ambassador Raymond Chrétien
By Lee H. Hamilton
Director's Forum
April 29, 1999

I am enormously pleased to welcome Canadian Ambassador Raymond Chrétien to the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.

The Quest for Sustained Growth: Southeast Asian and Southeast European Cases

This report assesses the “Washington Consensus” on liberalizing markets in pursuit of sustained economic growth. In 1997, the “Asian Economic Miracle,” thirty years of rapid growth and low inflation, ended abruptly with runs on Southeast Asian currencies and a massive flight of capital, precipitating deep economic recessions. Meanwhile, the countries of Southeast Europe had been struggling to reconstruct market economies out of the shreds left by socialist economies, their efforts complicated by civil strife or war.

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