International Security | Wilson Center

International Security

America Has a New Strategy in Afghanistan, But It Isn’t Actually Very New

On September 7, U.S. President Donald Trump abruptly called off his government’s talks with the Taliban—even though the two sides were on the cusp of a U.S. troop withdrawal deal.

With talks off (for now), the Trump administration has vowed to intensify its fight against the Taliban, with the hope that increasing battlefield pressure will compel the insurgents to come back to the negotiating table and make concessions—leading to a new deal with better terms for the United States.

Myths and Realities of Japan’s Security Policy

Is Japan moving away from pacifism toward militarism in light of changing realities facing East Asia? Can the U.S.-Japan alliance continue to meet the region’s security needs? Should Japan play a greater role for international security if it revises its constitution? Join us for a discussion on these issues as the Wilson Center’s Global Fellow Narushige Michishita attempts to demystify Japan’s security policy.

The Right Honorable Catherine Ashton in Conversation with the Honorable Nasser Judeh

The Wilson Center was honored to host a dialogue between Baroness Cathy Ashton, former EU Representative for Foreign Affairs and current member of the British House of Lords, and the Honorable Nasser Judeh, Senator in Jordan's Parliament and former Foreign Minister, on the present and future of Euro-Mideast relations. Europe has a rich historical relationship with the Middle East marked by shared values and common interests in maintaining peace and security in the region, as well as promoting mutually beneficial socio-economic policies.

What Does the Rise of China’s Security Partnerships Mean for Asia?

Over the past few weeks, new details have emerged around a potential Chinese military facility in Cambodia, which could possibly give Beijing its first installation of its kind in Southeast Asia.

Nuclear Weapons and Their Pride of Place in North Korea

Visiting my colleague Van Jackson’s office in New Zealand last week, I spotted a classic North Korean souvenir on his shelf: commemorative stamps, packaged as a booklet and sold to the tourist who brought it back for him as a gift last year. These stamps are not of the iconic Juche Tower or the Arch of Triumph (which every North Korean will point out is taller than its counterpart in Paris).

Managing the Rise of China's Security Partnerships in Southeast Asia

Over the past few years, while China has continued its criticism of the U.S. alliance system in the Asia-Pacific, Beijing has in fact been developing a network of new security partnerships of its own in the region. The emergence of these security partnerships is of potentially great significance, not just for Beijing’s own growing regional influence, but the alignments of other countries such as the United States and the broader regional security architecture.

An Obscure Organization with Outsize Importance

Last week in Orlando, the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) convened one of its regular meetings.

FATF is not exactly a household name, and not surprisingly its meeting garnered relatively little global media attention. And yet the organization plays a significant global role—and particularly with regards to Pakistan.

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