International Security

Rogue States and U.S. Foreign Policy: Containment after the Cold War

President Clinton and other U.S. officials have warned that “rogue states” pose a major threat to international peace in the post-Cold War era. But what exactly is a rogue state? Does the concept foster a sound approach to foreign policy, or is it, in the end, no more than a counterproductive political epithet? Robert Litwak traces the origins and development of rogue state policy and then assesses its efficacy through detailed case studies of Iraq, Iran, and North Korea. He shows that the policy is politically selective, inhibits the ability of U.S.

Strategic Balance and Confidence Building Measures in the Americas

With increasing globalization, national security is inseperable from regional security and depends on the establishment of effective mechanisms for cooperation. This book asserts that the creation of a framework for regional cooperation will depend on the establishment of the local level of confidence building measures. It evaluates the potential roles of such international organizations as the Organization of American States and the Inter-American Defense Board, and studies the changing regional policies of the United States for their effectiveness and impact on regional security.

Rabin and Israel's National Security

For more than forty years, Yitzhak Rabin played a critical role in shaping Israeli national security policy and military doctrine. He began as a soldier in the Palmach, the elite underground unit of the Jewish community in Palestine, served in the 1948 War of Independence, and ultimately became chief of staff of the Israel Defense Force (IDF), defense minister in several governments, ambassador to the United States, and, twice, prime minister. As chief of staff, Rabin led the IDF to its triumph in the 1967 Six Day War.

Bridled Ambition: Why Countries Constrain Their Nuclear Capabilities

This study presents an account of why nuclear weapons are rapidly becoming less attractive than they once seemed and what factors can motivate a country's leaders to keep nuclear ambitions in check. Written by an arms control expert, Bridled Ambition explains how nine countries—South Africa, Argentina, Brazil, Ukraine, Belarus, Kazakhstan, India, Pakistan and North Korea—have recently capped, curtailed, or rolled back their nuclear weapons programmes. Among the issues discussed how, when, where and why South Africa built the bomb, how they planned to use it and why they gave it up.

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