International Security

Atoms for Peace: A Future after Fifty Years?

On December 8, 1953, President Dwight Eisenhower proposed in a speech to the United Nations that nuclear nonproliferation be promoted by offering peaceful nuclear technology to countries that would renounce nuclear weapons. Today the value of that basic trade-off—atoms for peace—is in question, along with the institutions that embody it. Deployment of weapons by India and Pakistan, noncompliance with safeguards by North Korea and Iran, and the threat of nuclear terrorism have weakened the image of the Nonproliferation Treaty.

The Strategic Triangle: France, Germany, and the United States in the Shaping of the New Europe

France is Germany’s most important partner in the process of European integration. The United States was long Germany’s protector but now is the power balancing Germany’s in Europe. And the Franco-American relationship, though less prominent than the other two, has a great impact on both of them.

Regime Change: U.S. Strategy through the Prism of 9/11

The 9/11 terrorist attacks starkly recast the U.S. debate on “rogue states.” In this new era of vulnerability, should the United States counter the dangers of weapons proliferation and state-sponsored terrorism by toppling regimes or by promoting change in the threatening behavior of their leaders? Regime Change examines the contrasting precedents set with Iraq and Libya and provides incisive analysis of the pressing crises with North Korea and Iran.

Strategies of Dominance: The Misdirection of U.S. Foreign Policy

In a critical overview of U.S. foreign policy since the end of the Cold War, P. Edward Haley draws surprising connections between key elements of George W. Bush’s foreign policy and those of his predecessor, Bill Clinton. Haley further shows how these elements in both cases produced disastrous results, and he proposes an alternative that is constructive and tolerant but not amorally “realistic.”

Sino-Japanese Relations: Interaction, Logic, and Transformation

With the passing of the “friendship generation” and the increase in (mostly negative) societal participation in the late 1980s, the governments of China and Japan have found it increasingly difficult to navigate between the constraints and possibilities in their relationship. Based on ten years’ research in the United States, China, and Japan, this book argues that the relationship is politically now dispute-prone, cyclical, and downward-trending but manageable; militarily uncertain; economically integrating; psychologically closer in people-to-people contact yet more distant.

Kim Il Sung in the Khrushchev Era: Soviet-DPRK Relations and the Roots of North Korean Despotism, 1953-1964

Concentrating on the years 1953–64, this history describes how North Korea became more despotic even as other Communist countries underwent de-Stalinization. The author's principal new source is the Hungarian diplomatic archives, which contain extensive reporting on Kim Il Sung and North Korea, thoroughly informed by research on the period in the Soviet and Eastern European archives and by recently published scholarship.

The India-China Relationship: What the United States Needs to Know

As we move further into a new century, the two most populous nations on earth, India and China, continue a long and tangled relationship. Given their contested border, their nuclear rivalry, their competition for influence in Asia, their growing economic relations, and their internal problems, interaction between these two powers will deeply affect not only stability and prosperity in the region, but also vital U.S. interests. Yet the dynamics of the Chinese-Indian relationship are little known to Americans.

Rogue States and U.S. Foreign Policy: Containment after the Cold War

President Clinton and other U.S. officials have warned that “rogue states” pose a major threat to international peace in the post-Cold War era. But what exactly is a rogue state? Does the concept foster a sound approach to foreign policy, or is it, in the end, no more than a counterproductive political epithet? Robert Litwak traces the origins and development of rogue state policy and then assesses its efficacy through detailed case studies of Iraq, Iran, and North Korea. He shows that the policy is politically selective, inhibits the ability of U.S.

Strategic Balance and Confidence Building Measures in the Americas

With increasing globalization, national security is inseperable from regional security and depends on the establishment of effective mechanisms for cooperation. This book asserts that the creation of a framework for regional cooperation will depend on the establishment of the local level of confidence building measures. It evaluates the potential roles of such international organizations as the Organization of American States and the Inter-American Defense Board, and studies the changing regional policies of the United States for their effectiveness and impact on regional security.

Rabin and Israel's National Security

For more than forty years, Yitzhak Rabin played a critical role in shaping Israeli national security policy and military doctrine. He began as a soldier in the Palmach, the elite underground unit of the Jewish community in Palestine, served in the 1948 War of Independence, and ultimately became chief of staff of the Israel Defense Force (IDF), defense minister in several governments, ambassador to the United States, and, twice, prime minister. As chief of staff, Rabin led the IDF to its triumph in the 1967 Six Day War.

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