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International Security

Obama Administration Relations with Central America: A Conversation with Seven U.S. Ambassadors

"Central America is in the news a lot these days, often for the wrong reasons," Cynthia Arnson, director of the Latin American Program at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, noted in her introduction to "Obama Administration Relations with Central America: A Conversation with Seven U.S. Ambassadors." Organized crime has flourished while the robust economic recovery enjoyed by South America has bypassed Central America and Mexico; meanwhile, the region's proximity to the United States has spotlighted immigration and trade issues.

New Document Reader - The Euromissiles Crisis and the End of the Cold War: 1977-1987

The Nuclear Proliferation International History Project is pleased to announce its first document reader, produced in collaboration with the Cold War International History Project and entitled The Euromissiles Crisis and the End of the Cold War: 1977-1987.

Donga Daily article covers release of NKIDP Critical Oral History Conference transcript

An article carried in Korea's Donga Daily highlights new findings from a recently published NKIDP book, Crisis and Confrontation on the Korean Peninsula: 1968-1969 from the History and Public Policy Program Critical Oral History Conference Series. The article includes the new detail that the North Korean commando unit that attacked the South Korean presidential compound on 21 January 1968 also initially planned to besiege the U.S. Embassy in Seoul.

New NKIDP publication: "<i>Crisis and Confrontation on the Korean Peninsula, 1968-1969: A Critical Oral History</i>"

NKIDP is pleased to announce its latest publication entitled, Crisis and Confrontation on the Korean Peninsula: 1968-1969, from the History and Public Policy Program's Critical Oral History Conference Book Series.

The book contains the transcript of a critical oral history conference which explored the origins of North Korea's military adventurism in the late 1960s, and features the testimony of veteran South Korean, U.S., and East German diplomatic and intelligence officials directly involved in Korea policy during the turbulent period.

Wilson Center Convenes Broad Bipartisan Coalition Crafting New Global Engagement Organization

On Monday, December 13, the Wilson Center will convene a large, bipartisan coalition that is drafting a business plan for a new independent organization for public diplomacy and strategic communications. The effort is part of the Center's Strengthening America's Global Engagement (SAGE), Initiative launched in September to act on the recommendation of more than a dozen major studies conducted since 9/11 to form such an organization. The business plan will determine in detail the mission, structure, programs, target markets, and budget of the organization.

Book Launch: The Ultimate Weapon Is No Weapon: Human Security and the New Rules of War and Peace

To understand the security concerns of the developing world, we must understand that lack of institutional capacity has created a "house of cards," said U.S. Army Lieutenant Colonel Shannon Beebe, speaking at the Wilson Center on October 19. "When that card gets pulled out, the house is going to fall."

The Fog of Law: Pragmatism, Security, and International Law

When and why are international rules binding? Focusing on questions of state security, The Fog of Law considers the nature of obligation in international law. In so doing, it challenges the prevailing theories of obligation based on natural law or positive law approaches.

Germany Says No: The Iraq War and the Future of German Foreign and Security Policy

According to Dieter Dettke, Germany’s refusal to participate in the Iraq war signaled a resumption of the country’s willingness to assert itself in global affairs, even in the face of contradictory U.S. desires.

Connecting Histories: Decolonization and the Cold War in Southeast Asia, 1945–1962

Connecting Histories: Decolonization and the Cold War in Southeast Asia, 1945–1962 draws on newly available archival documentation from both Western and Asian countries to explore decolonization, the Cold War, and the establishment of a new international order in post-World War II Southeast Asia. Major historical forces intersected here—of power, politics, economics, and culture on trajectories East to West, North to South, across the South itself, and along less defined tracks.

Two Suns in the Heavens: The Sino-Soviet Struggle for Supremacy, 1962–1967

Using newly available archival sources, Two Suns in the Heavens examines the dramatic deterioration of relations between the USSR and China in the 1960s, whereby once powerful allies became estranged, competitive, and increasingly hostile neighbors.

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