Maternal Health

Can Genetic Engineering Stop the Zika Virus?

As concerns over the Zika virus grow, health officials are considering a combination of traditional and experimental measures to address the threat.  Eleonore Pauwels, a senior program associate with the Wilson Center’s Science and Technology Innovation Program, describes the knowns and unknowns surrounding the virus. From citizen science to genetic engineering, she sorts through options available to those on the front lines of efforts to stop the spread. That’s the focus of this edition of  Wilson Center NOW.

Guest

Infographic | Zika in Mexico

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A River Runs Again: Reporting on India’s Natural Crisis—and Its Surprising Solutions

The world’s second most populous country – projected to be first by 2022 – is developing faster than ever before, roiling the social, political, and environmental landscape.

Leveraging the Private Sector to Strengthen Maternal Health

In 2013, nearly 300,000 women died during pregnancy and childbirth. The majority of those deaths were in developing countries and entirely preventable. Much of the effort towards reducing this number has been focused on what governments should do differently, but the private sector plays just as important a role as the public sector, said a panel of experts at the Wilson Center on September 17

Engaging Health Workers in the Global Movement to End Female Genital Mutilation

Aissata M.B. Camara grew up in an educated, upper income household in Guinea, West Africa. One morning, she woke up to singing outside her window and knew they were coming. Many in her community thought that she was unclean and would grow up to be promiscuous if she wasn’t cut. She would be unmarriageable. While her family and community members held her down, she realized, “my body no longer belonged to me.”

A Prescription for a Secure Pakistan: Why Health is Vital for National Security and Economic Development

Pakistan faces many health challenges, including high infant mortality rates. Pakistan’s population growth and birth rates—the highest in South Asia—complicate efforts to provide quality and accessible health care to its citizenry. This event will address Pakistan’s health challenges, with an emphasis on maternal and child health and nutrition, and highlight the implications for stability and economic growth.

The Right IDEA: Engaging Decisionmakers on Family Planning in the Post-2015 World

Just a few years ago, progress on global family planning and reproductive health policy seemed to be stuck in a rut. “For 20 years, development money for health had been directed to fight HIV and poverty, and as a result, momentum, interest, and funding for family planning had dwindled,” said Susan Rich, vice president of global partnerships for the Population Reference Bureau (PRB), at the Wilson Center on July 15.

Restoring Hope and Dignity: New Developments and Best Practices in Addressing Maternal Morbidities

Obstetric fistula and pelvic organ prolapse are two common maternal morbidities that impact thousands of women in developing countries each year but are often overshadowed by maternal mortalities. Obstetric fistula, a hole in the birth canal caused by obstructed labor, affects between 50,000 and 100,000 women each year, mostly in developing countries. Pelvic organ prolapse, whic

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