Maternal Health

Changing the World: How USAID’s 50 Years of Family Planning has Transformed People, Economies, and the Planet

Since President Lyndon B. Johnson created the USAID population program in 1965, it has evolved in tandem with the global discourse on population and demography. “The agency’s family planning program is as relevant today as it ever was, and is necessary,” said Jennifer Adams, deputy assistant administrator of the U.S. Agency of International Development’s Bureau for Global Health.

Event: Climate Change and Vulnerable Watersheds in the Andes - Lima, PeruClimate Change and Vulnerable Watersheds in the Andes - Lima, Peru

Climate Change and Vulnerable Watersheds in the Andes: A Decision-Maker's Discussion on Improving Governance and Institutional Capacity (Lima, Peru)

May 21, 2015
8:00am - 5:00pm

Cambio Climático y Cuencas Hidrográficas Vulnerables en los Andes: discusión entre tomadores de decisiones sobre la mejora de la gobernanza y la capacidad institucional (Lima, Peru)

21 mayo 2015
8:00 – 17:00

Integrating Mental Health into Maternal Health Programs

In high-income countries, as many as 10 to 15 percent of women experience depression, anxiety, or other non-psychotic mental health challenges during pregnancy or the year after giving birth. In developing countries, the chances rise to 16 percent of pregnant women and 20 percent of post-natal women, according to Jane Fisher, professor of women’s health at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia.

South Asia Consultation on Maternal Health: Regional Dialogue and Way Forward

The state of maternal health in South Asia is difficult to assess. Although rates of maternal mortality are declining between 2 and 2.5 percent a year overall, the region’s massive population – one fifth of the world and over 1 billion people in India alone – means it still accounts for one out of three maternal deaths.

Global Trends, Local Stories: New Films on India and Ethiopia

On March 24, the DC Environmental Film Festival comes to the Wilson Center for the Washington, DC, premieres of two new short documentaries from ECSP, “Broken Landscape” and “Paving the Way.” Filmmaker and ECSP Multimedia Producer Sean Peoples will describe his journey from the eroded gullies of Ethiopia to the rat-hole mines of northeastern India during a panel discussion led by the Wilson Center’s Roger-Mark De Souza, with observations from Sierra Club's Kim Lovell and World Resources Institute's Ferzina Banaji.
 
About the films:

Call the Midwife: A Conversation About the Rising Global Midwifery Movement

The world is about to hit a “turning point” in maternal and newborn health, said Laura Laski, chief of the sexual and reproductive health at UNFPA, at the Wilson Center on March 23. “In terms of strengthening the new health system for achieving the MDGS or any other goals, we have to focus on the human resources for health.” In particular, midwives.

WC-15-11T Program Assistant (Maternal Health Initiative)

SALARY: WW-0303-05 $34,759 – $45,190 per annum

This position may have promotion potential to grade 7 level.

LOCATION:   WASHINGTON, D.C.

WHO MAY APPLY:  All qualified candidates may apply.

Since 2009, the Maternal Health Initiative (MHI) explores many critical and neglected maternal health issues.  MHI brings together scholars, policymakers, the media, and practitioners through events, research, publications, multimedia content (audio and video), and blog, New Security Beat.

Scaling the Mountain: Women, Health, and the Environment in Nepal

From the mountains and foothills of the Himalayas to the Terai plains, climate change is rapidly changing life in Nepal. Many communities however, are not strangers to environmental stress; for decades, rapid population growth alongside agriculture and fuelwood collection have degraded land and diminished forests.

What’s Next? Celebrating 20 Years of the Environmental Change and Security Program

Global crises like the Ebola outbreak force us to consider what “security” really means, said Sharon Burke, senior advisor for the New America Foundation. “Is security getting our kids to school and food on the table…or are you talking about military security and defense threats that require a weapon to counter?”

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