Migration

U.S. Spotlight Fixed Squarely on AMLO as He Takes Reins in Mexico

On Dec. 1, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador (AMLO) will be sworn in as Mexico’s president. AMLO’s presidency will have important ramifications for the United States.

Through trade, travel, heritage and history, U.S.-Mexico relations touch the daily lives of more American citizens than ties with any other country. The two countries trade over $1 million a minute, have over $100 billion in mutual investment and share a million border crossings a day.

Mexican Migration Flows: From Great Wave to Gentle Stream?

There are few relationships as long-standing, rich, and complex as the relationship between Mexico and the United States. Mexicans have always made substantial contributions to the labor force, economy, and culture of the United States, and today Mexicans continue to be the largest immigrant population in the United States. Not only is this population substantial in size, the flow of Mexican migrants coming to the United States is becoming more diverse.

Infographic | Is Deterrence Enough?

Caravan 'Crisis' a Chance to Forge Better Immigration Policy

President Trump’s demands for neighboring governments to stop the most recent migrant caravan heading to the U.S. from Central America highlight the pressing need for a region-wide strategy to deal with migration flows.

With the current caravan, the government of Mexico is caught between the forceful U.S. requests for action and portions of its own society sympathetic to the migrants. In addition, its freedom of action limited by weak enforcement and refugee mechanisms and legal frameworks favorable to migrants.

Infographic|Venezuelan Emigration: Exodus to the Region

Development is the Ultimate Deterrent to Excessive Migration

This article was originally published on The Hill.com...

On Oct. 4, Mexican President-elect Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador (AMLO) and President Trump had a phone call discussing an investment plan between Mexico, Canada and the United States to aid economic development in Central America and Mexico, with the aim to reduce the flows of illegal migration.

Is Deterrence Enough? Deterrence Policies in Mexico, and Finding a Way Forward in the U.S.-Mexico Bilateral Relationship on Migration

Deterrence strategies, such as deportation and detention, are a component of the United States and Mexico’s bilateral strategy to manage migratory flows from Central America. While deterrence strategies have had some success in the United States in deterring migrants from Mexico, there is little evidence to show that they have effectively reduced the rates of migration from the Northern Triangle.

Inventing the Immigration Problem: The Dillingham Commission and Its Legacy

In 1907 the U.S. Congress created a joint commission to investigate what many Americans saw as a national crisis: an unprecedented number of immigrants flowing into the United States. Experts—women and men trained in the new field of social science—fanned out across the country to collect data on these fresh arrivals.

Venezuelan Emigration, Explained

The massive outflow of Venezuelan citizens to other countries of Latin America and the Caribbean continues unabated, fueled by Venezuela’s economic collapse and repression of political dissent.  According to the United Nations, 2.3 million people—or 7 percent of Venezuela’s population—have fled the country, with more than 1.6 million having left since 2015.  The vast majority have gone to neighboring Colombia, straining the government’s ability to provide food, shelter, and medical care, but significant numbers have also entered Brazil, Ecuador, Peru, Chile, and Argentina.

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