Migration

Navigating Complexity: Climate, Migration, and Conflict in a Changing World

Climate change is expected to contribute to the movement of people through a variety of means. There is also significant concern climate change may influence violent conflict. But our understanding of these dynamics is evolving quickly and sometimes producing surprising results. There are considerable misconceptions about why people move, how many move, and what effects they have.

Beyond the Headlines: Climate, Migration, and Conflict (Report Launch)

As Syria has collapsed, spasming into civil war over the last five years, the effects have rippled far beyond its borders. Most notably, a surge of refugees added to already swelling ranks of people fleeing instability in Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, and sub-Saharan Africa, leading to the highest number of displaced people since the Second World War. At the same time, scientists have noted record-breaking temperatures, a melting Arctic, extreme droughts, and other signs of climate change.

Refugees in Brazil

What Does the World Expect of President-elect Trump: Mexico

Mexico Expects:

Russia is a Fortress, But Not a Refuge

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Bilingual, Bicultural, Not Yet Binational: Undocumented Immigrant Youth in Mexico and the United States

An entire generation of children, adolescents and young adults has been caught in the crucible of increasing criminalization of immigrants coupled with neoliberal globalization policies in Mexico and the United States. These are first- and second-generation immigrant youth who are bicultural, often bilingual, but rarely recognized as binational citizens in either of their countries. Since 2005, an estimated two million Mexicans have returned to Mexico after having lived in the United States, including over 500,000 U.S.-born children.

8 Misguided Arguments on Refugees and Terrorism

Refugee resettlement in the United States is as politicized as it has been in generations. That is a shame, because our current dumbed-down debate distracts us from reforms that could attract consensus support, decreasing security risks while ensuring the program’s viability.

Syria and the Global Refugee Crisis: A Conversation on Refugees with Refugees

According to one UN report, the number of people displaced by war and persecution in recent years is larger than what occurred during WW II and also larger than at any time since detailed record keeping began. A focal point has been the ongoing violence in Syria and the humanitarian and global refugee crisis it has created. A recent Wilson Center event conducted in cooperation with Smithsonian Media and the Independent Diplomat featured a conversation on refugees with Syrian refugees, giving voice to a group in the eye of the storm.

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