Migration

Development is the Ultimate Deterrent to Excessive Migration

This article was originally published on The Hill.com...

On Oct. 4, Mexican President-elect Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador (AMLO) and President Trump had a phone call discussing an investment plan between Mexico, Canada and the United States to aid economic development in Central America and Mexico, with the aim to reduce the flows of illegal migration.

Is Deterrence Enough? Deterrence Policies in Mexico, and Finding a Way Forward in the U.S.-Mexico Bilateral Relationship on Migration

Deterrence strategies, such as deportation and detention, are a component of the United States and Mexico’s bilateral strategy to manage migratory flows from Central America. While deterrence strategies have had some success in the United States in deterring migrants from Mexico, there is little evidence to show that they have effectively reduced the rates of migration from the Northern Triangle.

Inventing the Immigration Problem: The Dillingham Commission and Its Legacy

In 1907 the U.S. Congress created a joint commission to investigate what many Americans saw as a national crisis: an unprecedented number of immigrants flowing into the United States. Experts—women and men trained in the new field of social science—fanned out across the country to collect data on these fresh arrivals.

Venezuelan Emigration, Explained

The massive outflow of Venezuelan citizens to other countries of Latin America and the Caribbean continues unabated, fueled by Venezuela’s economic collapse and repression of political dissent.  According to the United Nations, 2.3 million people—or 7 percent of Venezuela’s population—have fled the country, with more than 1.6 million having left since 2015.  The vast majority have gone to neighboring Colombia, straining the government’s ability to provide food, shelter, and medical care, but significant numbers have also entered Brazil, Ecuador, Peru, Chile, and Argentina.

Tapping into Tech: How one organization is connecting returned Mexicans and migrants in Mexico to jobs in the tech industry

Between 2009 and 2014, approximately 1 million Mexicans returned to Mexico, through voluntary or involuntary means. For many, this return brings many challenges for integrating back into the Mexican labor force, new communities, and a new way of life. Returnees face cultural shocks, language barriers, discrimination, and employment and education hurdles such as improper documentation and inability to transfer educational credits.

Book Launch | Homelands: Four Friends, Two Countries and the Fate of the Great Mexican-American Migration

Today, immigration politics are at the forefront of U.S.-Mexico relations. Prize-winning journalist Alfredo Corchado explores the past and future of the immigrant story in his new book, which merges the political and the personal, telling the story of the last great Mexican migration through the eyes of four friends.

Reintegrating Returned Mexican Migrants through a Comprehensive Workforce Development Strategy

As part of his electoral commitments, Mexico’s President-elect, Andrés Manuel López Obrador (AMLO), promised to protect the rights of returning migrants and work towards their full integration into what he hopes will be a more prosperous Mexico. Returning Mexican migrants have great potential to contribute to the Mexican workforce, but there needs to be a better strategy to connect them with meaningful job opportunities.

The Hidden Problem of Forced Internal Displacement in Central America

While the public’s focus has understandably been on family separations and irregular Central American migration at the United States-Mexico border, there is growing evidence that many—possibly hundreds of thousands—of Central Americans from El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras have experienced forced internal displacement within their countries of origin prior to emigrating. The predominant narrative in the United States is that Central Americans are driven from their homes by the violence and flee northward in search of refuge.

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