Military History | Wilson Center

Military History

Sixteen Years and Counting in Afghanistan: What’s Next for America’s Longest War?

October marks 16 years since a U.S.-led troop mission entered Afghanistan to eliminate sanctuaries for al-Qaeda and to remove its Taliban hosts from power. Those initial goals were achieved fairly quickly, and yet more than a decade and a half later, American soldiers are still in Afghanistan fighting a seemingly unending war. This event addressed how we got to where we are today; what the best and worst policies would be moving forward; whether U.S.

A Rift in the Earth: Art, Memory, and the Fight for a Vietnam War Memorial

A Rift in the Earth tells the remarkable story of the ferocious "art war" that raged between 1979 and 1984 over what kind of memorial should be built to honor the men and women who died in the Vietnam War. The story intertwines art, politics, historical memory, patriotism, racism, and a fascinating set of characters, from those who fought in the conflict and those who resisted it to politicians at the highest level.

The 1967 Six-Day War

The 1967 Six-Day War:
New Israeli Perspective, 50 Years Later

Avner Cohen

 

Introduction [1]

The Six-Day War: The Breaking of the Middle East

 Guy Laron will discuss his latest book, The Six-Day War: The Breaking of the Middle East, which investigates the causes and consequences of one of the most significant moments in the Arab-Israeli conflict as well as the Cold War in the Middle East.

Le Thanh Nghi’s Tour of the Socialist Bloc, 1965

CWIHP eDossier No. 77

Le Thanh Nghi’s Tour of the Socialist Bloc, 1965: Vietnamese Evidence on Hanoi’s Foreign Relations and the Onset of the American War

Pierre Asselin
November 2016

Infographic | Mexico's Defense Structure

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Infographic | National Security Under Peña Nieto's Administration

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A Bond Worth Strengthening: Understanding the Mexican Military and U.S.-Mexican Military Cooperation

Over the past decade, the Mexican military has been crafted into hardened and more professional military, skilled in fourth generation warfare, operating across the spectrum of conflict from surgical small-unit Special Forces missions to division-level stability operations in areas comparable in size to Belgium. As new—state and non-state—threats loom on the horizon, the U.S. and Mexican militaries will need to rely on deepening their connection and increasing bilateral trust to build a stronger and interdependent defense relationship.  

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