Military History

Reins of Liberation: An Entangled History of Mongolian Independence, Chinese Territoriality, and Great Power Hegemony, 1911-1950

The author’s purpose in writing this book is to use the Mongolian question to illuminate much larger issues of twentieth-century Asian history: how war, revolution, and great-power rivalries induced or restrained the formation of nationhood and territoriality. He thus continues the argument he made in Frontier Passages that on its way to building a communist state, the Chinese Communist Party was confronted by a series of fundamental issues pertinent to China’s transition to nation-statehood.

Failed Illusions: Moscow, Washington, Budapest, and the 1956 Hungarian Revolt

Winner of the 2007 Marshall Shulman Book Prize, awarded by the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies

The 1956 Hungarian revolution, and its suppression by the U.S.S.R., was a key event in the Cold War, demonstrating deep dissatisfaction with both the communist system and old-fashioned Soviet imperialism. But now, fifty years later, the simplicity of this David and Goliath story should be revisited, according to Charles Gati’s new history of the revolt.

Reforming the Tsar's Army: Military Innovation in Imperial Russia from Peter the Great to the Revolution

From Peter the Great to Nicholas II, Russian rulers always understood the need to maintain an army and navy capable of preserving the empire's great power status. This volume examines how Imperial Russia’s armed forces sought to adapt to the challenges of modern warfare. The tsars inevitably faced the dilemma of importing European military and technological innovations while censoring political beliefs that could challenge the autocracy’s monopoly on power.

Global Land Mine Elimination and the Ottawa Convention: Canadian Foreign Policy at Work

In December 1997, 122 countries signed the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on their Destruction, commonly known as the Ottawa Convention. Canada led the effort to convene a world conference to debate the elimination of land mines and successfully led a 14-month push to get a treaty signed. Speaking at a meeting sponsored by the Wilson Center's Canada Institute, Christopher Kirkey discussed the impact of the Ottawa Convention on Canada-U.S.

Conflict Unending: India-Pakistan Tensions since 1947

The escalating tensions between India and Pakistan have received renewed attention of late. Since their genesis in 1947, the nations of India and Pakistan have been locked in a seemingly endless spiral of hostility over the disputed territory of Kashmir. Ganguly asserts that the two nations remain mired in conflict due to inherent features of their nationalist agendas. Indian nationalist leadership chose to hold on to this Muslim-majority state to prove that minorities could thrive in a plural, secular polity.

European Defense Cooperation: Asset or Threat to NATO?

This study surveys post World War II efforts to enhance practical cooperation among European countries in the provision and use of military forces. The author, a distinguished former defense official of the U.K., begins with the earliest proposals for cooperation in 1947 and provides a succinct summary of collective security efforts since then. The main focus of the study is the European Defense and Security Policy (EDSP) project launched by European Union heads of government at their Cologne meeting in June 1999.

Inventing Grand Strategy and Teaching Command: The Classic Works of Alfred Thayer Mahan Reconsidered

Between 1890 and 1913, Captain Alfred Thayer Mahan published a series of books on naval warfare in the age of sail, which won a wide readership in his own day and established his reputation as the founder of modern strategic history. But Mahan’s two principal arguments have been gravely misunderstood ever since, according to Jon Tetsuro Sumida. Instead of representing Mahan as an advocate of national naval supremacy, Sumida shows him asserting that only a multinational naval consortium could defend international trade.

Rabin and Israel's National Security

For more than forty years, Yitzhak Rabin played a critical role in shaping Israeli national security policy and military doctrine. He began as a soldier in the Palmach, the elite underground unit of the Jewish community in Palestine, served in the 1948 War of Independence, and ultimately became chief of staff of the Israel Defense Force (IDF), defense minister in several governments, ambassador to the United States, and, twice, prime minister. As chief of staff, Rabin led the IDF to its triumph in the 1967 Six Day War.

Brothers in Arms: The Rise and Fall of the Sino-Soviet Alliance 1945-1963

This volume brings together young scholars from China, Russia, the United States, and Western Europe who, drawing on much newly available documentation, analyze the complicated and often stormy history of the Sino-Soviet relationship from World War II to the 1960s. The book offers new insights and many revaluations of the various apsects of the alliance between China and the Soviet Union—its creation, aims and instruments, its strains and conflicts, and its final collapse.

Churchill as Peacemaker

Winston Churchill had an acute appreciation of what belongs to war and what belongs to peace. We tend to remember his resistance to Nazi tyranny during the Second World War and his actions as a man of war. In this book, scholars from the United States, Great Britain, and South Africa examine his other actions and comments, those that reflect the primary focus of Churchill’s long career: his attempts to keep and restore peace throughout the world, from Queen Victoria’s little wars to the Cold War.

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